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I am an undergraduate student majoring in Public Relations and minoring in Nonprofit Organizational Leadership with high hopes of becoming a lawyer. I would highly appreciate any tips to execute the LSAT and what looks good on a resume for law school. Thank you!

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4 answers

Emily’s Answer

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Hi! I just took the LSAT in January. I won't beat around the bush-- It's a tough test. That being said, it is a test you can do well on! The LSAT is all about preparation. I would recommend creating a schedule for yourself to study for the test. Dedicate 1-4 hours a day, depending on how much time in advance you begin studying. I think ideally, you start studying around 6 months before the exam, but you can do it in 2-3 months if you really have time to dedicate yourself. A great (and free) program you can use is Kaplan Learning, it helps you set up a schedule quite easily and offers tons of free practice questions, tests, and explanations for them. If you are willing or able to spend some money, Testmasters is another great option for test prep.

The LSAT really is just practice, practice, practice. You should take at least 10 diagnostic tests before your exam day. The more familiar with the material, the better you will handle curveballs on the exam.

There's also the element of stress and well-being. When I took the exam, this was the hardest part for me to manage. It's important to give yourself time to have fun, eat well, get plenty of rest, and just let your mind take a break.

In terms of resume, I know that law schools not only look for well-rounded applicants, but those who show they are passionate about something. If you are fresh out of college looking to apply immediately, admissions will also be looking to see if you have the mental maturity to thrive in law school, so keep that in mind during your application.

Good luck!
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Jennifer’s Answer

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Hi and congratulations on picking a career path! I took the LSAT 20 years ago and I’m sure things have changed but when I took it, I prepared by taking a lot of practice tests. If there are schools that don’t require it, that would be a good option too. As far as what looks good to law schools, I think the nice thing about law is that there are people from all different backgrounds and college majors. For instance I was a math major and my friend was a music major in undergrad. I think a lot of the schools obviously look at grades but also take life experiences into consideration as well. Try to emphasize to the schools what your strengths are and your reasons for wanting to go into law. It sounds to me, from your interest in nonprofits, that perhaps you are considering a law career in the nonprofit or public sector world. If that is the case, I think that is great, and that could be something to share on your applications. Good luck! Also if you ever have the chance to extern/intern/work for a judge, I highly recommend. It is a great way to see the legal system and a wide variety of cases.

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Sheryl T. Smikle,’s Answer

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Hello, what a great background. The LSAT, like many standardized tests, are optional for some law programs. You might want to consider those schools, which are generally competitive. If you take the LSAT, I always recommend taking a test prep course. I am very fond of Kaplan as I worked for the founder while in high school and after college graduation.

Sheryl T. Smikle, recommends the following next steps:

  • Investigate colleges that require the LSAT and those that waive it. Look into a test prep program.
  • Take the LSAT diagnostic if you are skeptical about test prep. See if you score a 24 or better.
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Xiao’s Answer

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Hi Yanet,

The great thing about law school is that you can literally major in anything and still be an amazing candidate for law school!

The LSATs can be daunting, but you should remember that they are like any other standardized tests! The same skills you used for the SATs are still directly transferable to approaching the LSAT (i.e. lots of practice, context, familiarity with the exam will be extremely helpful).

I would make a list of the schools you want to attend and look at what the statistics are and ranges for their first year class. This will help you gauge the scores, GPA, backgrounds of the individuals who were admitted and also what you'll want to aim for!

Best,

Xiao

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