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Is it crazy to take 2 science courses + 1 math course in one semester?

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I am going to transfer to a 4-year university as a biology major, but the classes they require are mainly and only science + math classes. I already finished my "smaller" classes in the previous semesters, such as art, English, history, etc. Each of my remaining semesters in school will typically include biology, physics or chemistry, and math (calculus sequence). I am not sure if this will be overwhelming to manage, but I am determined to put in all my effort.
#math #chemistry #science #college #major #biology #university #mathematics #calculus #bioscience

Actually it's a good ides, however it will probably take more years than 4 it depends and it will defiantly impress an interviewer and will make him most likely to hire you Allison M. Translate
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Kim’s Answer

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Tina,

That is typical of what happens at the upper level courses, for all majors. Since this is your major, you should be good at these subjects, and motivated to learn, both of which will help you. Remember to take into consideration any labs. My concern is that you are changing schools, and need to get acclimated to the campus as well as the style of teaching, which, may be different. Two sciences, one math. . . any other classes? How many total hours? I would definitely not have over 15 hours (including labs). Even if you have to take summer classes, or an extra semester, it is better than getting bad grades and setting yourself up for failure. So, you know you. Do what you need to do to have a successful first semester at the university!
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Patty’s Answer

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I think it all depends on the level of class. Do all the science classes have lab? I believe you can take multiple science and match classes but know going in you will have a lot of work and be ok with that from the beginning. You can do it!
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Kristin’s Answer

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If the classes sound interesting to you, I wouldn’t shy away from taking them all together. It sounds like you got a lot of your generals out of the way and you’re majoring in biology, correct? So go ahead and do them all at once. A nice bonus by taking them together is that some subject matter might roll over between classes, or at least relate to each other, which could make it easier for you to study for them at once. The only real downside to taking several math or science courses together is if you struggle with these subjects or have a really difficult time understanding the course subject matter. Then it would really be up to you and the effort you want to put in to studying, or utilizing resources to you. Hope this helps!
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Rachel’s Answer

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Absolutely not. You can certainly take 3 challenging courses in one semester. That being said, you will need to study every day. Procrastination could easily lead to failing grades with a heavy course load. Go to class. Go to office hours. Stay on top of your work.
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Yasemin’s Answer

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Hi Tina, I think it's very helpful that you completed your gen eds because this will give you time to focus on the harder classes. I don't think it will be hard to complete 2 sciences and 1 math classes together. Many students take about 4-5 classes per semester so it is definitely doable! Just make sure to space it out, and keep a planner so you can mange your workload. If you really keep on top of your work you can do it and do well in the classes. Reach our to your professor and tutoring services on campus when you get stuck so things don't build up and you are ready for test days!

Best of luck!
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Gustavo’s Answer

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Hello! I don´t think that is crazy, but it will require an enormous compromised of you. If you are a kind of person that has a real commitment to achieve your goals, I think it is not a problem. When I was doing my post-graduation studies, I have done several disciplines and performing experiments and so on. But why I faced that? Just because I have self-knowledge of myself, it is one of the essential things that every person must pursuit first of all. If you have self-knowledge about you, matters become more comfortable, it is precious advice that I can give to you. If you appreciate your free time, other leisure activities, you must take into account perform two science courses and math together, but if it is not a problem for you. You face it as just a period of your academic life etc.... you can performed both. How can I said it is a decision that first needs self-knowledge. Honestly, I think you can handle with it, has in mind that you need an extra dedication to complete these objectives okay. I hope helped you, sincerely my best regards.
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Riley’s Answer

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If that is what is required by your major, then no! What would really be crazy is to take only one hard class at a time and save everything for the end. I have been taking either 5 or 6 classes every semester for most of my college life, and while it was extremely stressful, I would say the workload is doable. As long as you set aside time plan ahead each week and you don't lose sight of your goal, you can totally handle it!

Riley recommends the following next steps:

  • Practice time management skills to ensure you have time to dedicate to each course.
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David’s Answer

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I don't see it as crazy to take 2 science courses + 1 Math course as it is upper level courses and getting more focus into your major. if you count from these 3 courses you are looking at 11 credits, 1 science course plus a lab is consider as 4 credits and tried to stay in the 15 credits range as a base. Most science labs will use a lot of your time and adding more classes to it will make you have less time to do others things or even catching up with some course work if you miss out. Best thing to do is every semester tried to keep a max of 2 labs course work and the remaining fine some major-related upper level course and elective to be stress-free.
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Aicha’s Answer

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Hi Tina! In my opinion it truly depends on you and how hard you are willing to work. If you are willing and prepared for the workload then you should be fine. If you want to have a lot of spare time then maybe you should only take one science course and the math or whatever you want. Ultimately this is your choice, but I think you should be fine if you know your priorities and if you are going to put effort into all of the classes!

I hope this helps! Good luck.
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Angela D.’s Answer

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This is a tough question! You've already won half of the battle before even stepping into the classroom with your "can do" beliefs about effort! Variables to consider...how many hours (as Kim mentioned), scheduling (morning/afternoon/evening & how many days per week), the course set-up in these COVID-19 days (face-to-face, hybrid, online), expected deliverables (quizzes, tests, midterms, finals, papers, lab results, etc.), the professors/instructors (experience, ratings, etc.), and most importantly...yourself! Do you have the self-discipline to juggle this level of workload and still maintain an acceptable GPA without burning out? Note that a 12-unit courseload is considered full-time whether at the semester or quarter system in terms of financial aid and continuous enrollment requirements. Yes, many students do take more credit hours than that, but this is more challenging for STEM majors. Also, coursetaking in upper division often requires a certain sequence and prerequisites, so you'll need to be mindful of that, in consultation with your guidance counselor. Bottom line of the deal is...you know your own habits, study skills, past strengths and stretches, and motivation! Wishing you the best in your endeavors, Dr. B
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Cassandre’s Answer

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Hi Tina,

I love the determination, good for you! I used to be a biology major as well so I know exactly how you feel. Usually each science course is paired with a lab course. If you add a math class on top of that, it can be overwhelming. Realistically, if you're not working a part-time job, I think you will be able to handle the workload. Best of luck!
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