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What is the best way to reach out to a recruiter?

There is this rotational program that one of the companys I would like to work for offers. They accept 3 different applicants into the program: developers, data scientists, and designers. I want to apply for the designer position however at this time they are currently only looking for developers. I found a recruiter for the company on LinkedIn and want to ask them if there is any chance the designer role will be open again or maybe it hasn't been opened yet? I'm not sure whats the best way to ask this. How could I phrase the question in a more professional manor? technology internship computerscience

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Tidjan’s Answer

When inquiring something to the recruiter on LinkedIn, it helps to be straightforward and concise. Remember to introduce yourself, state why you are messaging, give some indication of what value you can bring to the table.

"Hello X. I noticed that your company is only looking for developers for the Rotational Program. Would you be able to provide any insight as to whether there will be opening in the future for the other positions. I know can be of great value to your company due to X. "
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Kelly’s Answer

In my experience, recruiters are pretty open to meeting people regardless of what roles are open. I would reach out to the recruiter for a quick introductory call and ask whether they'd be open to giving you more details on the company and the various roles throughout - then ask for their advice on the best ways to position yourself for the role that sounds most interesting to you. I would come VERY prepared to this call with really well thought out questions for the recruiter such as: how would you describe the company's culture, what does the typical career path for someone junior in this role look like, what opportunities for learning/mentoring do you have within the company, etc?
Hope that helps!

Hi Kelly, reach out to the recruiter on LinkedIn. Be polite, brief, and concise. Irene Tovar Castro

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Taylor’s Answer

Hi Sam,

I think it's great that you are interested in a rotational development program. I did one for Finance and it was highly valuable. Before reaching out to the recruiter I would consider finding someone on Linkedin that is currently in the program so you can learn from them. You should know as much as possible before going to the recruiter so they know you are serious and have done your "homework" so to speak! After you feel prepared, you can reach out to the recruiter to learn more and express your interest. You can indicate that you would love to be on the radar for future open opportunities or what you can do to prepare in order to be an excellence candidate. In the meantime, maybe there are other companies that offer something similar that you can consider

I hope this helps and best of luck!
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Bridget’s Answer

Hi Sam! I'm a recruiter and agree with what everyone has said here. Reaching out won't hurt you as long as you're prepared! If this Rotational Program is beginning to accept applicants, no doubt the recruiters working for the company are getting a lot of questions about the process. Don't be nervous about taking that initiative, it shows you're serious about applying and want the role. I would definitely suggest connecting with the recruiter on LinkedIn and adding a note that includes:

1. Who you are (name and year in school/major if applicable should be sufficient)
2. Why you're reaching out (to make a new connection? to learn more about the open positions? In your case, you want to know if the designer position is still open, so make sure you're specific so the recruiter knows what you're looking for)
3. Thank you!

As others have said, make sure you've done your homework on the company and the program. If the recruiter wants to get on the phone with you you'll feel much more prepared if you know about the program and have your questions ready to go. It can be helpful to go over your own experiences as well in case they ask you to tell them about yourself. At the end of the day, they will appreciate the initiative you took to find out more, and even if you find out they are no longer accepting applicants for the designer position you will have gained valuable networking practice!

Thank you for the advice Bridget! How would you suggest moving forward with no response from a recruiter? I've tried to reach to some on LinkedIn but I needed to connect with them first to be able to send a message. I tried to fit as much as I could to so they know a little about me and why I'm reaching out but there's only so many characters allowed when trying to connect. I reached out to about 2-4 people and haven't gotten a response back, its been about 2 weeks. Sam S.

Hi Sam! Not getting a response is definitely frustrating, and the character limit on LinkedIn poses a challenge. Recruiters can be inundated with messages sometimes so it probably couldn't hurt to reach out again and put yourself back at the top of their inbox. If they still don't get a response back to you, unfortunately I feel like there might not be much more you can do. Hopefully someone does respond and can get you moving through the application process ASAP! Bridget Sherman

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Jason’s Answer

Recruiters dont bite, feel free to reach out to them and see what they have to say :)
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Walt’s Answer

I would second the suggestion that a cover letter can be a great way to reach out to a recruiter in the context of applying for a position with one additional pointer: personalize the letter.

Recruiters - especially those at large companies - see very high volumes of applications. In some cases, they use artificial intelligence to screen through the cover letters and resumes for key words describing your experience. Recognizing that, it's important to personalize the letter to both the company and the position using similar language and highlighting your most relevant skills and any experience that you have that will support your assertion that you're a strong candidate for the role. The added benefit of personalizing the letter is that it will make you stand out as a candidate who really wants this specific job at their company (vs. a candidate who just wants any job).

If you're just trying to make a connection via LinkedIn, a cover letter is likely unnecessary but the same principles apply. A personal touch to the note that demonstrates genuine interest will carry you much further than a generic one.

Walt recommends the following next steps:

Research how to write a strong cover letter
Draft a few sample cover letter templates that you can edit and personalize for individual jobs
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Pro’s Answer

Write an attention-grabbing resume and cover letter and email it to them. Or you could even bring it to them in person and ask to speak to a recruiter while you're there.
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Clarissa’s Answer

This is an excellent question and you are taking proactive steps to be hired into the rotation program. I find all answers here are awesome and relevant. I would add you could research more about the company on their website and Linkedin to understand more about the company's vision, mission, products and solutions prior to the call with the recruiter. Be sure to communicate your enthusiasm and be confident during the call. Hope this helps.
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