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If I am a teen fresh out of high school and who wants to get into a ADN or BSN program at a college, how am I supposed to take and pass the TEAS if I don't know much about nursing subjects? If the TEAS is to test us on how well we know nursing then wouldn't that completely contradict the whole point of going to a nursing program?

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Dan’s Answer

The TEAS test covers Reading, Math, Science, and English and Language Usage. It is a general pretest for admission into a nursing program and does not include nursing specific material. It is usually taken just prior to starting the actual nursing courses as part of the nursing program admission requirements.

I was a community college advisor and many students started taking pre-nursing classes (including remedial english, math, and science) then took the TEAS test prior to applying to the nursing program. If you do a Google search for "TEAS practice", you will find there are free tutorials for the TEAS test which will allow you to see for yourself what they cover. You can also contact your local college advisor office and ask them to explain the nursing admission program.

If you have a High School diploma and you pay attention in college, you will be able to pass both the TEAS test and earn a nursing degree.
Thank you comment icon Thank you, this is really helpful. Justin
Thank you comment icon You are welcome! I have found Nursing to be an exciting and challenging career path. If I can be of any further assistance, please do not hesitate to reach out. Good Luck in your journey! Bo Iglehart, RN, BSN, CCM
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Sandra’s Answer

Hello Justin,
The purpose of the TEAS, like other entry assessment exams, is to test your academic knowledge before entering a college program, such as nursing; deciding to enter an academic program requires some level of knowledge in a particular field before full entry into a program; there are a couple of choices for pre-entry exams for nursing programs; the TEAS or the HESI can be taken to assess your knowledge level for nursing school entry; some nursing schools require one or the other, either TEAS or HESI; here are a few resources that can determine your decision on which test that may suit you the most: https://uniontestprep.com/teas/blog/hesi-vs-teas-what-s-the-difference#:~:text=The%20TEAS%20tends%20to%20assess,in%20addition%20to%20general%20knowledge.
https://www.mometrix.com/blog/difference-ati-teas-6-hesi-a2-test/ (this website includes practice exams); and videos: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Lam1J485P6s , and https://www.sidmartinbio.org/which-is-harder-the-teas-or-hesi/Is_it_stressful_to_take_the_Hesi_exam ; good luck on your entry exams for whichever college you choose.
Thank you comment icon Thank you, this is amazing! I really needed it. Justin
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Jacqueline’s Answer

Hi Justin,
It appears you have had your questions answered regarding the testing. One piece of advice, I would steer away from ADN programs as the Institute of Medicine future if nursing report is focused on advancing the career of nursing and soon there will be less and less ADN programs but more so, less jobs for ADN prepared nurses. I suggest you go for your BSN.

I agree with others’ advice to you regarding preparing for the exams. Lots of free test prep material out there. So much of attaining your nursing degree is testing and not what it’s actually like to be a nurse. Just have to get through school, your boards and then you really learn on the job. Deep breaths. Many have come before you and had panicked thoughts about it all. Preparation is key and you will succeed!
Thank you comment icon Yes now that I have put more thought into it, I will go for a BSN. Thanks for the advice, I will study as much as possible every day! Justin
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Hassan’s Answer

From my reading, the TEAS is more focused on the life science and anatomy than the SAT or ACT are. https://www.kaptest.com/teas/free/teas-practice has practice questions to try. It's going to assess your readiness to do well in an ADN or BSN program and not a nursing certification.

There are four general subjects on the test: reading, math, science, and English and language usage. https://www.atitesting.com/teas-prep has extensive prep info. you can purchase.

Thank you comment icon Your advice was so helpful! Justin
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Bo’s Answer

The Test of Essential Academic Skills is a standardized multiple-choice entrance exam for allied health programs in addition to nursing. It is not a test of nursing knowledge. The rationale behind taking the TEAS is that it is a reliable predictor of academic potential for nursing school success. This is one of the tools used to determine the ability of the student to adjust to the program.
Nursing programs are extremely competitive. There is a severe nursing shortage and schools do not have the capacity to fill the need. According to the AACN's 2019-2020 Enrollment and Graduations In Baccalaureate and Graduation Programs in Nursing, over 80,000 qualified applicants were turned away from admission to programs due to insufficient faculty, clinical sites, classroom space, and clinical preceptors. Budgetary restraints are an additional factor.

ADN vs. BSN has been debated for over 30 years! In 2010, The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation recommended that all new nurses complete a BSN program within 10 years. Many hospitals are emphasizing BSN in the hiring process. All hospitals seeking Magnet status must have 80% of nurses with a BSN or higher. A 2017 study from AACN indicates that 49% of hospitals and other facilities require new hires hold a bachelor's degree and 86.3% of employers have a strong preference for BSN graduates.

An ADN program is from 20-24 months depending on the school attending full time. ADN generally focuses on technical clinical tasks and day-to-day care, along with updating charts.

A BSN program can be completed in 36 months. BSN have increased autonomy in decision-making based on their advanced knowledge and understanding of RN skills and specialties. In addition to direct patient care, BSN has the capability of executing leadership, administrative, and management roles within an institution or may engage in roles in public health, research, or education.

Faster BSN options include RN to BSN online programs which can be completed in as little as 1 year. There are several 16 months Accelerated BSN programs designed for students already holding a Bachelor's degree in any other field.

An additional option is a Bridge program for current LPNs, paramedics, respiratory therapists, and cardiovascular technicians. ADN can be earned in 16-18 months or a BSN in 28-32 months.

According to The American Association of Colleges of Nursing, BSN preparation is reportedly better prepared in 12/16 areas related to safety and quality, and a 10% increase in BSN lowered patient mortality by 10.9%. Quality of care may be diminished and contribute to preventable deaths when professional nursing personnel is replaced with those in assistive roles.
Thank you comment icon Loved reading this, thanks! Justin
Thank you comment icon Hey I have another question, I just discovred that there is ANOTHER test that I have to take before getting into a nursing program. This test is called the national league of nursing pre examination and honestly I am freaking out. I have been studying for the ACT hard for the past few months and then I realized that to get into a nursing program we have to take and pass the TEAS... and now I discovered that there is ANOTHER test which is freaking me out. Why is there so many entrance exams? How am I even supposed to study for this? I am not good at math that I haven't been taught. I have straight A's but I can't remember jack from my freshmen or sophomore year. Are these signs that nursing isn't for me? Justin
Thank you comment icon Justin,-take a DEEP breath. It is completely natural to feel a lot of stress and question your choice. This shows you are most likely an excellent candidate for nursing school. The PAX is another one of the steps to make sure the best students are in those limited programs spots and will be successful. There are a number of FREE practice tests available online. as well as study guides., flashcards. If you feel you are not good at math, I would suggest concentrating a little more on review and PRACTICE. Remember there are no calculators allowed during testing. Tests are just a tool to get an idea of the playing field. Bo Iglehart, RN, BSN, CCM
Thank you comment icon I have been an RN for 36 years. I don't remember all my exam scores, but I scored just under 1000 on my SAT, I graduated Cum Laude from my ADN program and completed my BSN after a traumatic brain Injury (TBI) with a 3.6 . Take advantage of all the free resources online-these did not exist when I was an ADN student but found them extremely helpful in preparing for my certification in Case Management(CCMC). Hang in there-Keep me posted. I am happy to provide support and guidance. Bo Iglehart, RN, BSN, CCM
Thank you comment icon I apologize for freaking out earlier... You are right thank you for your advice. I will search online and study for this exam over the summer. Again thank you and I'll keep you posted. Justin
Thank you comment icon No apologies are necessary. The message I understand is that you are a caring, intelligent person who will most likely be successful and make a GREAT nurse. I would be more concerned if you were not nervous and anxious. Remember not to OVERTHINK and OVERSTUDY. Make time several times per week and allow for breaks and self-care. It is a journey not a sprint. For the life of me, I don't know why there are several chemistry requirements- In 36 years I have never had to use it to perform my nursing duties. Just part of the process. Have a TERIFFIC Thursday! Good Luck and best wishes for success. Bo Iglehart, RN, BSN, CCM
Thank you comment icon Thank you so much, I will and I hope you do as well! Justin
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