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Hi, I would like to go to a certain school but it is expensive so I need a plan B. My aunt gave me the idea of starting at a CUNY or somewhere cheaper and then transferring to the other school my last two years. This is definitely a good option and I was wondering what you guys think of it? Is there anything that I should be aware of (besides transferring credits) in regards to transferring? Thanks

I'm going to be a high school senior and plan to do this because I'm not exactly sure what do study & don't want to spend 30k/year trying to figure it out...

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Subject: Career question for you

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Jason’s Answer

spending your first two years at a CUNY or better yet, a community college, you are doing yourself such a service financially. At the end of the day, no one cares where you started school. Most dont even care where you finished school. Most care if you have a degree and what that degree is in. Save yourself alot of money like you are being told.
Take your time and figure out what you want to do before you are spending 50k+ and under even more pressure. You do not need to go into college with a major declared.

You are getting good advice from your aunt.
Thank you comment icon I appreciate the input and yes I'm grateful for her advice :) Ivana
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La' Tonia’s Answer

That is a great idea. I started my college journey at a two year BMCC in Manhattan. Later I transferred to John Jay and graduated all CUNY schools. CUNY school or community colleges are great starts. You can do all your core requirements English, Math, Science for a lower cost. Also, you can do what I did get a job at a company that has tuition assistance programs. I was fortunate enough to work for Verizon and they paid for my Bachelors and Masters degrees. I have no school debt. Your Aunt is putting you on the right track.
Thank you comment icon Thanks for your ideas and personal story :) Ivana
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Kim’s Answer

I'd say you are lucky to have your Aunt, and it's great that you are willing to consider her advice! Another option. Join the military. I'm not sure exactly what you have to do to qualify for them to pay for your college. Look into it. If you can do 4 years and qualify for schooling assistance, it's not that bad of a deal. You will learn a skill (they will evaluate you to see what your best aptitudes are), learn to interact with diverse people, travel, learn to take responsibility and be a leader, etc. Young people with military service are much more mature than their counterparts, and employers like that! Four years seems like a long time, but, it will go by fast!

Give it some thought please!
Thank you comment icon I am lucky thanks and I appreciate the advice. Ivana
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Rube’s Answer

Your aunt's idea is a really good one. I am in the process of a similar situation where I started at a community college and will transfer to my desired college. This helped me not waste money on the core classes that will transfer to a major college. This may also help you decide your major, given that most community colleges have a class for undecided majors in which they help you decide your major. Small community classes could help you better transition to the big university life. This option has a ton of benefits.
Thank you comment icon Okay thanks and did you go in as undecided? Did you have an idea on what you wanted to study? Has it changed? Ivana
Thank you comment icon I did go in as undecided, but I knew that I wanted to study something engineering based. With the help of a counselor and the teacher teaching the class that helped us choose a major, I was able to narrow it down to mechanical engineering. I know plenty of students who took more than a semester to decide or had to change majors. There is nothing wrong with that. Rube Garduno
Thank you comment icon Ohh I see thank you so much. I might want to go in the business field and I don't know if I should go in as business management or undecided. I feel like business management might be too specific to business and what if I don't like it? On the other hand, undecided may cause me to take many classes that I don't like at all and be a wats of time maybe. Ivana
Thank you comment icon Your first semester or two usually consist of CORE classes that you are required to take, such as intro math and writing classes. One can use this first semester while undecided to take those core classes and to get elective classes out of the way. This would "buy" you some time to decide your major and make it to where you are not taking classes that do not count towards graduation. I took College Algebra, Intro to Communication (elective), U.S. History, Geography, English 1101, and First Year Students mini-mester. They all counted towards my graduation "path" at Georgia State. Rube Garduno
Thank you comment icon Got it, thanks a lot Ivana
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Piper’s Answer

A high school history teacher recommended this pathway for all graduating seniors. I think it is a good pathway! It is a cheaper option, plus at the end of the day you will still receive your diploma from that college/university. Definitely work with a career counselor to make sure credits transfer. I know that sometimes these can be tricky and lead to needing to spend another year in school.
Thank you comment icon I am really grateful you took the time to answer this question. Ivana
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Scott’s Answer

As others have stated, starting off at a community college is a great way to go. It will save you SO much money in the long run and you will be getting the same education. Do not fall in the trap of 'Ill just take out a bunch of student loans now and pay them off later when I get a great job'. Debt stinks and it accrues faster than you'd think. Just make sure the school you go to is accredited and credits transfer (dont just assume, many smaller 'for profit' schools do not transfer). One last piece of advice- use your first two years at a community college to really perfect your time management skills. School, work, social life, really learn to manage them. Time management is what really gets most transfer students who are used to living at home, having meals prepared for them and their basic needs being provided. Learn these skills NOW before you go away for school.
Thank you comment icon Wow thanks for all of this advice Ivana
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Jaquelyne’s Answer

Going to CUNY or community college is a great option and is something I wish someone told me when I was looking into colleges. I think it is a great option if you are 1 trying to save money but most importantly still figuring out what you want to major on. I would say that if you are going to go a community college route is that you do have to stay more focused and it may be difficult to register for classes.
Thank you comment icon Okay thanks. I don't plan on going to a community college but rather a cheaper 4 year or CUNY. Are you saying that it would be more complicated to register for classes when transfer? Ivana
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