Skip to main content
3 answers
Asked Viewed 343 times Translate

Should I be afraid if I don't get a part-time job/internship sometime within my university career?

Experience needed experience

+25 Karma if successful
From: You
To: Friend
Subject: Career question for you

2
Pros
2
0

3 answers


Updated Translate

Victoria’s Answer

Hi Tiffany,

This is a great question.

I think it is really important to gain some type of work or volunteer experience while you are attending university. You want to focus on school but you also want to show once you graduate that you are ready for the world of work. Why is this important?

During an interview a prospective employer is trying to determine:
1) if you are a good fit for their job,
2) if you have skills that transfer to be successful at that job, and
3) if you have a track record of success in completing assignments.

Internships, part-time jobs, and volunteer experiences show how you handle projects, people, leadership, teamwork, planning, success, and even failure (if you learn from failure then employers see that you think critically about how to make a situation better and you have problem solving skills).

Ideally you should try to find opportunities in your field or skills that are needed in your field.
Start small with a simple volunteer opportunity. If you can provide more information on your major or your career interest maybe we can brainstorm some ideas with you.

experience

As a political science major, you have a framework for understanding how to work issues that might involve a community, government, and/or non-government solution. At your university, you will find classes, lectures, club, and volunteer opportunities that reach out to the community. You might even consider a semester or trip abroad. Networking is also something that occurs when you help other people. Because volunteers have such different backgrounds and experiences you may work with other volunteers that will widen your worldview or spark your curiosity.

One area you might also consider is public affairs, which is a combination of applied political science and communicating ideas through technology, social science, financial management, budgeting, languages, law, medicine, and many other fields. Try to incorporate STEM areas like business, operations research, and statistics if you can because many issues today have a technical component. It's not required but these areas are very, very useful for solving real world problems.

You might even consider working on a political campaign or a public affairs news program. There are many possibilities with your major. Articulate/discuss your goals every step of the way. Google United Nations and learn everything you can about it. Visit it if possible and find the path to achieve your goals. I am very excited for you. This is a great journey.
My major is political science, and my ultimate (if not big) goal is to work in the United Nations or an NGO! Tiffany K.
Hi Tiffany, I added some more information to the original answer to help you with political science and getting to the UN and NGOs. Victoria German
1
Students
1
0
Updated Translate

Victoria’s Answer

Hi Tiffany,

This is a great question.

I think it is really important to gain some type of work or volunteer experience while you are attending university. You want to focus on school but you also want to show once you graduate that you are ready for the world of work. Why is this important?

During an interview a prospective employer is trying to determine:
1) if you are a good fit for their job,
2) if you have skills that transfer to be successful at that job, and
3) if you have a track record of success in completing assignments.

Internships, part-time jobs, and volunteer experiences show how you handle projects, people, leadership, teamwork, planning, success, and even failure (if you learn from failure then employers see that you think critically about how to make a situation better and you have problem solving skills).

Ideally you should try to find opportunities in your field or skills that are needed in your field.
Start small with a simple volunteer opportunity. If you can provide more information on your major or your career interest maybe we can brainstorm some ideas with you.

experience
0
Updated Translate

Simeon’s Answer

I wouldn't be too afraid. If you're qualified for an entry level position for a specific skill set, you should be able to line something up eventually. I'd be proactive about networking. Reach out to fellow students and professors. You won't have as much success trying to reach out to people in the industry already. You want to make friends while they're still at your level of aspiring to be in the career field some day. You have to build the bridges long before you need to cross them. Once your friends land their own jobs at companies, they'll be able to recommend you for openings from the inside (which is one of the most sure-fire ways to land a job).
0