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As an introvert, is out of state tougher to transition to than in state?

I am an introvert that is eyeing many out of state schools, such as MIT and Princeton, but is also willing to attend the University of Arizona, where I live. For some people (generally extroverted), leaving the home seems like an exciting and very desirable experience. However, I have always felt more close to home and am nervous about potentially moving to a complete different place with different people, vibes, and weather. Does anyone have any good advice? #college

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Ken’s Answer

Regardless of whether you are an introvert or not it really does not matter what school you attend, as the most important factors are how well you do with the school work, which is an indication to an employer about what kind of employee you will be, and the effort that you put forth in your networking to set up networking connections that will help you throughout your education/career journey. Here is an important video for you to watch: ## http://www.ted.com/talks/julie_lythcott_haims_how_to_raise_successful_kids_without_over_parenting?utm_campaign=social&utm_medium=referral&utm_source=facebook.com&utm_content=talk&utm_term=education ##


Getting to know yourself and how your personality traits relate to people involved in various career opportunities is very important in your decision making process. During my many years in Human Resources and College Recruiting, I ran across too many students who had skipped this very important step and ended up in a job situation which for which they were not well suited. Selecting a career area is like buying a pair of shoes. First you have to be properly fitted for the correct size, and then you need to try on and walk in the various shoe options to determine which is fits the best and is most comfortable for you to wear. Following are some important steps which I developed during my career which have been helpful to many .

Ken recommends the following next steps:

The first step is to take an interest and aptitude test and have it interpreted by your school counselor to see if you share the personality traits necessary to enter the field. You might want to do this again upon entry into college, as the interpretation might differ slightly due to the course offering of the school. However, do not wait until entering college, as the information from the test will help to determine the courses that you take in high school. Too many students, due to poor planning, end up paying for courses in college which they could have taken for free in high school.
Next, when you have the results of the testing, talk to the person at your high school and college who tracks and works with graduates to arrange to talk to, visit, and possibly shadow people doing what you think that you might want to do, so that you can get know what they are doing and how they got there. Here are some tips: ## http://www.wikihow.com/Network ## ## https://www.themuse.com/advice/nonawkward-ways-to-start-and-end-networking-conversations ## ## https://www.themuse.com/advice/4-questions-to-ask-your-network-besides-can-you-get-me-a-job?ref=carousel-slide-1 ##
Locate and attend meetings of professional associations to which people who are doing what you think that you want to do belong, so that you can get their advice. These associations may offer or know of intern, coop, shadowing, and scholarship opportunities. These associations are the means whereby the professionals keep abreast of their career area following college and advance in their career. You can locate them by asking your school academic advisor, favorite teachers, and the reference librarian at your local library. Here are some tips: ## https://www.careeronestop.org/BusinessCenter/Toolkit/find-professional-associations.aspx?&frd=true ## ## https://www.themuse.com/advice/9-tips-for-navigating-your-first-networking-event ##
• It is very important to express your appreciation to those who help you along the way to be able to continue to receive helpful information and to create important networking contacts along the way. Here are some good tips: ## https://www.themuse.com/advice/the-informational-interview-thank-you-note-smart-people-know-to-send?ref=recently-published-2 ## ## https://www.themuse.com/advice/3-tips-for-writing-a-thank-you-note-thatll-make-you-look-like-the-best-candidate-alive?bsft_eid=7e230cba-a92f-4ec7-8ca3-2f50c8fc9c3c&bsft_pid=d08b95c2-bc8f-4eae-8618-d0826841a284&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=daily_20171020&utm_source=blueshift&utm_content=daily_20171020&bsft_clkid=edfe52ae-9e40-4d90-8e6a-e0bb76116570&bsft_uid=54658fa1-0090-41fd-b88c-20a86c513a6c&bsft_mid=214115cb-cca2-4aec-aa86-92a31d371185&bsft_pp=2 ##
Here are some ways to reduce college costs. Too many people end up with unnecessarily high college debt. Here are some ways to prevent that from happening to you. ## http://www.educationplanner.org/students/paying-for-school/ways-to-pay/reduce-college-costs.shtml ##
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Richard’s Answer

That is a good question. MIT, Princeton and University of Arizona. All wonderful schools. Whether you are an introvert or extrovert, I think it is important to visit each and talk to people there (ie professors, students, maybe even those considering attending). When I went to college, I went to University of Iowa my freshman year. It was a great school, but I just never felt a "vibe" that I belonged there.I enjoyed the architecture, the tradition on Saturdays at the football games, and I even I joined a fraternity, and tried to get to know others, but ended up hanging out with high school friends. I made many trips home on the weekend, four hours away, to the suburbs of Chicago. I can't point my finger on any one things, but it was not home for me. I had a friend at Arizona State University. He was studying to be a lawyer. He loved it and thought I would too. Even though that was far away from the suburbs of Chicago, I just felt a connection. Things just seemed to click. I connected with people right away, I had professors interested in my growth. I could walk into there offices and talk to them. It felt like home. It had all the "right stuff," that "vibe" that I was looking for. I wondered if I had visited ASU and Iowa, would I I have felt that then and gone there my freshman year? I don't know, but I wish I would have visited both. I think even after I graduated, I still had to have that feeling of "vibe" as part of my criteria choosing a place to live, or a place to work, and a profession to take on. Even though University of Arizona was the main competitor of ASU, I had the opportunity to work in Tucson. The job turned out to be great, and I fell in love with the beauty of the Santa Catalina Mountains. Tucson became home for many many years. While I miss Tucson very much and will always love it, the new place that feels right for me is Florida, where I have a lot of family. Because I work remote, I can work from anywhere, which is nice.

So, not sure I answered your question, but I would recommend visiting each of your favorite schools. Talk to people at each. I think after you do, you will know the right decision.

All the best!

Richard
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