3 answers
Asked Viewed 37 times Translate

How do health care workers get through their day when they know they can't help everybody?

I feel like this is going to be the toughest part of the job while working in healthcare. I want to know how health care workers cope with the stresses of losing patients. #medicine


+25 Karma if successful
From: You
To: Friend
Subject: Career question for you
3
100% of 3 Pros

3 answers


Updated Translate

Steven’s Answer

Jadyn:
You have asked a very good question. I heard this saying once and I repeat it now: 'Going into medicine and expecting not to grieve is like going into the ocean and expecting not to get wet.' Many things in healthcare can hurt besides losing a patient. Medicine is very data and task-intensive so there are many opportunities for mistakes. As a medical student and an anesthesiology resident, I was immature and had a lot of difficulty in very sad circumstances such as losing a patient who died on the operating table. What all of us who wish to help care for others need to do is develop internally personal values, maturity, and means of dealing with the wide range of emotions that are experienced in healthcare.

A cardiac surgeon advised that 'you have to be able to sleep with [actually after] your complications.' The more critical the situation, the greater the chance for a negative outcome. Now on top of that, add that you may feel you either committed an act of omission or commission which either failed to help the patient or actually worsened the patient's condition. The guilt and remorse don't last for just days or weeks. Usually, it can be felt for months or years. You have to develop a strong enough character to deal with those feelings. This is a challenge and we must develop these coping skills because someone must take care of these patients. It might as well be you. It is not easy. It is hard. By asking your question, you already wisely have sensed this and are on your way to begin to develop coping skills. Good luck!







Steven recommends the following next steps:

Study different coping skills
Saved!
Read about fiction or non-fiction that is written about what you are interested in pursuing.
Saved!

1
100% of 1 Pros
Updated Translate

Simeon’s Answer

It's one of the less mentioned parts of the medical field that you have to have solid emotional boundaries. There's a lot of emotional fatigue in the industry, so it's quite common for people to stop feeling emotions for their patients at all. There's a delicate balancing act between leaving the emotions in the hospital and not having emotions at all. Each health care worker has to come up with their own solution. The hospital chaplains can be quite helpful listeners if you end up needing someone to talk to about it all.

1
100% of 1 Pros
Updated Translate

Rebecca’s Answer

Take care of yourself first and foremost. I love the saying, "you can't pour from an empty cup." Honing coping skills is absolutely necessary. Learn what fulfills you and brings you life outside of work and helping others so that you do not get burnt out. Sadly, you will never be able to fully help everyone who needs help. And you may feel upset and frustrated by this, there are many times when it is. out of your control. Patients may refuse care, insurance may stop paying for services, you may not have the best resources at your fingertips. The list goes on. But focus on what you ARE doing. Be present in the way you are able to help patients, because everything you do makes a difference. You can take a moment to grab that cup of water or clean up the patient's tray. These small acts of kindness can go far in helping patients, even when you are unable to meet every need a patient has.

0