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what is it like being an NUCLEAR MEDICINE PHYSICIANS

I'm Currently In Job Corps Looking For A Career For When I Finish To See If I Wanted To Try And Attend College Or Not. #healthcare #medicine

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Mercedes’s Answer

Nuclear medicine physicians are Radiologists that specialize in Nuclear medicine. If I’m not mistaken, that is a sub specialty of Radiology and requires additional training or fellowship after completing a Radiology residency. I am an Obgyn physician but have many friends that are radiologists and considered becoming a Radiologist when I was in medical school. One of the things that I liked about the Radiology field is that you can read images from home and can work from home.
Nuclear radiologists work in hospitals, research centers, universities, or clinics. Mostly, nuclear radiologists conduct tests, but they are also qualified to give treatment.
On a day-to-day basis, nuclear radiologists will administer radiopharmaceuticals, do body scans to see how those substances interact with the body, view test results, and discuss their findings with patients and doctors. Depending on the findings, a nuclear radiologist’s role in a patient’s care may end there, and the person’s doctor will use the results to form a treatment plan. If, based on the testing, a patient requires radiopharmaceuticals, the nuclear radiologist will continue to be a part of the treatment plan.
Like with any other field, you need to love it and enjoy it. I decided against becoming a Radiologist because I did not like it and did not enjoy it. It does take a long time to become a radiologist but once they are done with training, they are paid very well and you will have a lot of flexibility in your schedule.
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Michelle’s Answer

I agree with the two previous answers. I don’t knowing you have any prior education. Become a NM Physician is a long haul. You have to be strong in math and science and have a college degree. This is followed by Medical school/ residency and fellowship.

A Nuclear Medicine Technologist is a licensed profession. There are various educational programs, most now on an Associates or Bachelors level. Look at the JRCNMT.org website to see which ones are accredited. That is important as it leads graduates eligible to take the Certification exams to qualify for their boards/leading to licensure.

A NMT is a multi-disciplinary field. The Technologist makes/ administers and images the radio pharmaceutical that is emitted from their patients and can now diagnose and treat almost anything in the body. There’s a lot of science and math involved and direct patient care. Safety is critical as you’re working with ionizing radiation but it’s relatively low levels and it’s deemed safe if used properly.

I hope this helps answer your question.

Good luck!
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Mark’s Answer

My sister is a Nuclear medicine technician (I know not exactly physician). She went to a program at Belmont University in Nashville Tennessee. There were a lot of biology and chemistry classes involved in getting the degree. Originally when she started out her days consisted of explaining procedures to patients, giving them contrast if required and then preforming the imaging. So you do have interactions with several people from day to day both patients and coworkers.

She was able to get promoted through her career and now she is managing the nuclear medicine department at a private radiology practice. She's told me that while sometimes there can be long hours the work is rewarding. I hope this helps you.
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