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How can you tell which scholarships are requitable? I come across so many scholarships and have filled out many but never hear back from them.

The finacial strains of college is really stressful and I am looking for scholarships and grants to help fund my education without having to rely on loans. #debtfreecollegestudent

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Angela (Angie)’s Answer

Hi Jasmine, there are definitely red flags to look out for: application fee, no proof of past winners, open to everyone, etc.

Angela (Angie) recommends the following next steps:

Here is a link for red flags to look out for: https://www.usnews.com/education/blogs/the-scholarship-coach/2011/04/07/9-signs-of-college-scholarship-scams
Here are some reasons why you may not have heard back yet: https://myscholly.com/theblog/thelongwait
Thank you comment icon Hi Jasmine, Something I would recommend to try is communicating with your school to see if they have any resources for you! My college had many "work study" opportunities where you would get paid to do a position with the intention that you could do your homework at the same time! Although most positions of that sort are paid minimum wage, if you're already studying-might as well get paid to do so! Hope this helps Caitlin Hamberger
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Bryan’s Answer

I would start with the Federal Pell Grants website here: https://studentaid.ed.gov/sa/types/grants-scholarships/pell


They list a few other grant programs here: https://studentaid.ed.gov/sa/sites/default/files/federal-grant-programs.pdf


Another idea would be to join the military and use the GI Bill. I did not join the military but it does offer this benefit to veterans.


Find a school you want to attend and ask their financial assistance department how you can get the grants you need to go to that school. They may also be aware of grants you did not know about.


You could also ask your church if they have any grant money available for your college or ask your parents if they would be willing to take out a loan to help you.


Choosing a junior college for your first two or three years can also make the cost lower and that is what I did.  I had summer jobs that paid for junior college, and I got through the rest of my degree with 1) Pell Grant, 2) a fund provided by my church (it was a loan but it was a low-interest loan), and 3) a Parent Plus loan which was another low-interest loan my parents took out in their name.

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