3 answers

How much math exactly is involved in Computer Science?

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I want to major in computer science in college but am scared about the math classes that I know I'll have to take. I'm not the best at math but still want to give computer science a try and would like to know what types of classes I'll have to take and their difficulty.

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3 answers

Manaswini’s Answer

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As a software Engineer, we should always look at optimising the code (ensuring it has the least possible CPU process cycles (typical O(function(n)) algorithm analysis), making it as generic as possible and, making sure it has the best solution). A simple math logic can be implemented in solving some complicated problems. Say, there is an array, which has one non-repeated number and rest duplicates (9,6,9,7,6,7,4,5,4). if you consider this example, only 4 is not repeated, rest are present exactly twice. If you are asked to find that non-repeated number, brute force method will make your code complicated. With a small Mathematics implementation, performing XOR operation on the array will give you the answer 5 without making your code convoluted.
Similarly, many ML, Data Science algorithms will need Simple and Complex Maths logical implementations [statistics] to get your application working efficient. The simple logical extrapolations makes problem-solving easier, strong and, pristine.
:)
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Patanjali’s Answer

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When you are learning to code at academics, you will have mathematics as part of your curriculum. In the real world you may or may not be using it a lot. If you are someone who does basic automation such as scripting or working on applications that use certain business logic, you may not use much of mathematics in your daily work. If you are working on developing code for Machine Learning, Artificial Intelligence, Operating Systems etc., you will need to have a good understanding of Data Structures.
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G. Mark’s Answer

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You'll likely be required to take math up to integral calculus. But frankly, I've been a Computer Engineer for close to 40 years, and I don't think I used integral calc more than a half-dozen times. However, you will likely take discrete mathematics, which will come in handy. Also, you'll study algorithms, which involves math as well. Once you get into it, you may enjoy it. One thing about math is that a lot of instructors teach it in a fairly arcane way. That is, they don't have a skill for making math interesting or making it accessible to folks who have developed an aversion to it. Math can be lots of fun, but you need a good teacher. Try to look for a tutor who's recommended by other students. Also, look around for the sort of "Making Math Fun" books, which often do a great job of conveying the concepts in a more understandable way. I've found that there are a lot of good tutorials on the web that are intended to make the topics really come alive rather than relying on too much jargon too soon.

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