4 answers

What type of training have you received and how has it benefited you?

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4 answers

Patricia R’s Answer

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Edwin,
I was a classroom teacher for a long time. Following those years, I had a couple other jobs in education over the next many years. (Just to set a context for my response.)

Having been through more than a ton of sessions, I can truthfully say that the terms "training" and "education" are often used to mean the same thing: when you have to, or choose to - go listen to someone talk to you who is supposed to know more about the topic than you do - but may or may not.

Oh, and you’re supposed to learn something from it.

Another term used a lot in Education circles is "Professional Development."

As I said, I’ve been the receiver and/or the provider for more than a thousand such sessions. Some were as short as an hour or two, and some were spread over a longer time.

Here’s my take on the whole thing:

*Training*
Training involves learning a new skill or improving ones you already have. For example, in teaching, I knew how to keep my students busy in the classroom, but as times changed, I needed new skills on managing my classroom, because the students changed. The students in my last years of teaching did not behave in the same kinds of ways that my earlier students had, so I needed to update my skills.

*Professional Development*
Just as the name implies, Professional Development (PD) is more about your already having a profession, but one in which new things are being discovered or updated, and you want to understand them and be able to use them in your job/career. For example, if you are an accountant who specializes in providing assistance to people with their taxes, you definitely want to know about any new tax laws and regulations that came into effect since the last tax year.

Teachers want to know about what new research has found about how kids learn, so they can help their student be more successful.

*Education*
To me, Education takes longer, requires deeper understanding, and can be used in different situations. For example, friend of mine, who is 90, only understands about this much |…..| about technology and how it works, but he knows a LOT about cars and WWII radios. So when he asked me this morning, “OK. What the heck is ‘Wi-Fi’?” I could explain it to him in terms of what he understood about wireless radios, because I have an understanding of cars, WWII radios, *and* Wi-Fi.

My education has been lasting all my Life – so far – even though I have not been back to school as a student since 2006, nor as a teacher since 2014.

In terms of befits to me? I like to understand as much as I can about as much as I can (especially the Natural World) – just because I like – LOVE – learning. It’s helped me have a better life.

Patricia R recommends the following next steps:

  • Take a concept that you learned in one class/course/subject, and figure out how to apply that understanding in another area. For example, in math, there is a lot to learn about fractions, ratios, and counting. How can any of those be applied to music and rhythm? How can the idea of counting be shifted to figure out about how many ants are crawling all over your red-and-white checkered napkin that you purposely laid on the ground at a picnic after it got smeared with ketchup?
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Sue’s Answer

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My training as a nurse has helped me in many aspects of my life!! It allows for independent thinking as well as critical thinking in my job as a homecare nurse & as well as in life in general. Homecare nursing allows for autonomy & having to think quickly on your feet & putting your knowledge you learned from nursing school into action everyday with all the patients you encounter in a day's time. It allows for the personal touch & the one on one care that you do not have in a hospital setting. It teaches you all about the dynamics of a family & how an illness of one person can affect the different family members in very different ways. It teaches you to be a good listener & to be a problem solver.
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Alan’s Answer

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You need to understand the difference between training and education. Training is narrow development of skills preparing you for a job. Education is broad experience that enables you the underlying understanding of a career.

I trained to become a certified teacher. At the end of my four degree I decided to student teach. This enabled me to have a teaching job. Somehow I felt the need fora broader understanding of education and how to help troubled children. So I went back to school to get my masters degree in counseling. I still felt the need for more education so entered a doctoral program leading me to become a private practice psychologist.

All in all I discovered that training is necessary for an entry level job but education is important to develop a career.
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Kuldeep’s Answer

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I have received my doctorate degree in the field of polymer chemistry from university of Missouri and prior to that I have done my Masters by thesis in the field of organic chemistry. During my academic career, I have received the training through my mentors and self learning in different aspects of chemistry laboratory such as setting up of organic reactions, isolation, purification and characterization of different compounds with the use of various analytical techniques.
I am currently working as an analytical chemist wherein, lot of unknown samples are received from different clients. We have to identify and characterize the materials using the data obtained through the results of the various analytical techniques. My training obtained during academics is certainly proving to be useful in deciphering these daily activities now during my professional career.
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