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Is there different certification for HVAC?

I'm a job corps student and will my certification be useful around the whole country? #students #job

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Emma’s Answer

According to HVACtraining101.com

"HVAC certification licenses means HVAC technicians are trained and qualified enough to perform installation and repair tasks within their state. Technicians can become certified after passing exams that test a technician’s knowledge of the trade.

There are three types of certifications that HVAC technicians can obtain as professionals. Some states require technicians to become licensed and certified by passing exams, and the federal government regulates certification in the Code of Federal Regulations Section 608 of the Clean Air Act.

Some states require technicians to take tests to demonstrate their proficiency and knowledge of the trade before being able to practice as a journeyman. "
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Allan’s Answer

I am answering from Ontario Canada. Our rules are different from rules in the US. Rules even change in Canada from province to province.
The 1st answer is pretty good about indicating that it is important to consider what some people refer to as "on the job training". In Ontario Canada we have a training system designed to give you a "license" for your trade based on a of hours of experience required to complete what is called "an apprenticeship". You would also be required to attend 2-- 8 week school terms through the process of your training time to get education from people who have been in the trade and had the opportunity to work on"real world" situations. The difficulty with training is (example we are using HVAC TECH) you get 4-1/2 yrs training (9000 hours) to be considered an "AC tech". Each time you go on a call for service each call will be deferent than the last. Sometimes very little, sometimes a whole lot.
I guess what I'm trying to explain is in this trade SAFETY IS PARAMOUNT!. Don't take shortcuts. Until you are comfortable with yourself on the job as a "Tradesperson" you will be nervous. Nervous with your boss. Nervous with your partner. Nervous with your customer. Some systems use special refrigerant and you need to understand that specific refrigerant. What is does, how it is supposed to act, and how you are seeing it act. This is all part of your training.
There is another trade in Ontario called Gas Technician. One of the recommendations is EVERY CALL you have your own notebook and write down what you found on arrival for the call and what you did, and how you let the call/ job site. Example of items you would record"how you left the job site"...gas manifold pressure, exhaust gas temperature, flue differential pressure. These could be similar things you would record. This is YOUR RECORD. It isn't part of your service call paper work. It is your record of what YOU DID. You keep this. When I did my gas training my instructor said keep these record books for MIN 10 YEARS. If you do this it's your record of what you did and what you can go back to for your protection. It protects you. Protects your boss, and protects the company you work for.
All food for thought. ,🙂🙂🙂
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