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Should I be worried that I cannot perform up to the expectations of a job?

When I don't know something about the task that was given to me at my job, it's a good idea to ask a colleague. What happens if I really don't know much, to the point where I get fired from my job? #job #career

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Colin’s Answer

Hi Jeffery

Great question. While it’s perfectly normal to be nervous going into a new job, I wouldn’t let it overwhelm you. Most employers understand that there is a learning curve and you will have to learn a lot on the job, especially if it’s an entry-level position. Asking questions to a colleague or supervisor is always a good idea, as long as it’s the right person to answer that question.

Even if you make a mistake, the most important thing to do is learn from it and try not to do it again. Everyone makes mistakes and most employers won’t care if you make a simple error now and then. It only becomes a problem if you keep making the same mistake over and over and don’t alter your behavior in the future.

In general, if an employer is willing to hire you, it means that they have confidence in your abilities to handle the job. So as long as you’re honest about your experience and abilities in your interview, you shouldn’t worry too much about meeting expectations. Just keep an open mind and learn as much as you can. Even if it isn’t a good fit, you can always take it as a learning experience and look for a position you’re better suited for.
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Taylor’s Answer

Hello Jeffrey! I echo the 2 answers from above entirely. There definitely is a learning curve with a new job AND managers do appreciate honest effort, even if the result isn't 100% correct right away. I also tend to be my toughest critic so I would encourage you to give yourself some grace!

The first 30-60 days of a new job are often the most challenging. I would encourage you to write down your goals for the next 3 months and discuss that with your manager. I have found that open communication is always the key to success. As long as your manager knows what goals you are working towards, they can help you achieve that and feel more confident in your abilities. They may connect you with a mentor, or a peer that has been working at the company longer than you. After a month or so, have a check in with your manager or mentor to see how far you have come. I bet you that you will be so happy and pleasantly surprised at how far you have come!

I would also say, be sure to take care of yourself in the meantime. My mantra is "You cannot pour from an empty cup. Take care of yourself first!" Be sure you are doing the things outside of work that make you happy and feel energized or else you won't be able to put your best foot forward in the workplace.

Best of luck and keep your head high! Use your community and network to help you achieve your goals!
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Angela’s Answer

Hello! I have worked with several managers and had some ups and downs in my career thus far. One thing that has always been consistent is that most managers recognize effort. If you are putting in the time and effort to be successful - you're showing that you care about the job and staying employed at that company. I highly recommend that you set one-on-one time with your manager. Put yourself out there and request that time. This is a great way to get feedback from your manager about continuous improvement and also build a strong working relationship with him/her. Another tip is to find a mentor! This person can give you advice and help advocate for you if something were to get to a point where your employment is at serious risk. Shadow the peers on your team that are really successful.
This advice I'm giving requires you to be vulnerable and "put yourself out there". It's important to do that and stay confident in your skills!
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Sudeep’s Answer

Hi Jeffrey

I would not make too much of a fuss about not being able to perform unless of course, you now for sure you do not have the skills, competencies or knowledge to do the job.

Still be aware of your own performance is a good sign as it demonstrates your motivation - and that is to be success and be successful.

Thus, your general bias in terms of your attitude to work should be towards ensuring you are trained, have the knowledge, learn quickly and be prepared to watch and observe others.

All the best.
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