Skip to main content
10 answers
14
Asked 630 views

How do I find a career I would enjoy and thrive in?

This is part of our professionals series, where we ask professionals what they think students should know

+25 Karma if successful
From: You
To: Friend
Subject: Career question for you

14

10 answers


0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Jason’s Answer

Explore and talk to people! Think about things you enjoy doing or skills you are proud of and then find people that are doing those things or exercising those skills. Ask them questions about what it took to get where they are, what they did for school, any specialized training they had to go through, and what their work is like now. Don't be intimidated if they're much better at your favorite skill than you are - you're just starting out! People are usually very happy to share their experiences and give advice, so don't be afraid to ask.

If you are curious about specific jobs or careers, you can ask to help out as an intern or volunteer. Even if there is little or no pay initially, it's a great opportunity to try something out with little risk. If you find it's not the type of work you enjoy, it's easy to leave and move on to another option. If it is something you enjoy you will have already had some experience and made contacts in the field, which will put you above the competition when it comes time to jump in for real!
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Matthew’s Answer

Choosing a career is a significant decision that can shape one's life trajectory. It is essential to find a career that not only pays well but also provides job satisfaction and fulfillment. However, finding a career that one enjoys and thrives in can be a daunting task, especially with the numerous options available. This report aims to outline practical steps to identify a career that aligns with an individual's skills, interests, and personality traits.

The first step towards finding a fulfilling career is to assess personal interests. This involves taking inventory of hobbies, passions, and activities that bring joy and fulfillment. Identifying areas of interest can provide insight into the type of work that an individual would enjoy doing. For instance, individuals who enjoy writing can pursue careers in journalism, content creation, or copywriting.

Assessing personal skills and strengths is critical in finding a career that one would thrive in. Identifying areas of expertise and natural abilities can help determine the type of work that would be a good fit. For instance, individuals who excel in problem-solving can pursue careers in engineering, science, or technology.

Personality traits play a crucial role in finding a career that provides job satisfaction. Individuals should evaluate their personality traits, such as their communication style, work style, and level of extroversion/introversion. For instance, individuals who prefer working independently and enjoy a quiet work environment can pursue careers in research, writing, or programming.

After identifying personal interests, skills, and personality traits, individuals should research potential career paths. This involves gathering information on job requirements, education/training, salary, and job outlook. Individuals can conduct online research, attend career fairs, and speak with professionals in the field to gain a better understanding of the career.

Gaining experience through internships, volunteering, or part-time jobs can provide valuable insight into a potential career path. Additionally, networking with professionals in the field can provide valuable connections and mentorship opportunities.

In conclusion, finding a career that one enjoys and thrives in requires a deliberate approach. It involves assessing personal interests, evaluating skills and strengths, considering personality traits, researching potential career paths, gaining experience, and networking. With careful consideration and exploration, individuals can find a career that aligns with their values and provides job satisfaction.
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Steve’s Answer

I would suggest you find out what you are good at first, then spend time getting better at it - repetition and hard work, put in the 10k hours to be great at it! I wouldn't follow a passion or something you 'enjoy' at first, I would stay the course on what your talent is.
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Mary Jean’s Answer

I suggest Internships. This way you can experience what a "day" looks like in the fields you are interested in. You will learn, gain experience, build relationships and start your Networking.
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Yatendra’s Answer

The only way out is try try and try every oppurtinity you get, in line with what you like. Just get your hands dirty on it. Untill and unless you have not been a part of it, it would be very difficult for you to figure out that whether you REALLY like it or not. There are many things in this world which we feel that we like them. But when we do it actually we started losing interest in it and we realize that this is not my cup of tea. Also there might be people around you who would give suggestions to you based on their experience to do this or to do that. Just ignore them.
The more you explore, the more you are increasing the bandwidth of your brain. Which resultantly in the end gives you the clarity that what exactly you love. It is a common problem faced my majority of people. So you are not alone in this ship !!!
Tip - Start writing on paper or notepad, whenever you are planning something. By doing this it would bring more clarity in your thoughts and you can direct your subconcious mind to focus more on your goal. Trust me it works. Even I had this problem initially. There was a lot of confusion in choosing my career. But once I started implementing this trick. Gradually I was more clear in my thoughts. I am not saying that it will work in a same day. But it works for sure. There are loads of resources on internet which proves the efficacy of this practise. Also you are not loosing something by doing this (in case not gaining)
Hope this will help you to some extent.
Thank you...
Best of Luck....
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Anna Lyn’s Answer

I agree with Michael, Ray, and Jason above…

Volunteer. For example if you plan in pursuing higher education/career in healthcare, visit your local hospitals and check out their volunteer opportunity. Talk to the volunteer supervisor if you want to volunteer at other departments. It’s not bad to ask because you’ll never know it’s possible they can arrange a full day/s or a week in that specific department. Talk to the staffs and fellow volunteers regarding careers. Once you get exposed to the healthcare world, observe and you’ll have a feel if you want to be one of the workers there someday.

Healthcare is not just doctors, nurses, aides, therapists, pharmacists, maintenance, or social workers. It’s more than that— there are engineers, biotech, researchers, administrators, and etc.

Try to attend to free job and/or college fairs in your community to get some ideas where you want to be. Your mind may change about career choices once you talk to people with different professions. It’s also up to you if you have the patience and dedication to pursue a career with longer or shorter education.

Good luck with your career exploring!
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Michael’s Answer

Great question - For me, I asked myself where I could make the biggest impact in others lives. I struggled in school and had a difficult time accepting failure. I wanted to provide the same opportunity for kids/adults to learn in a safe space, give everyone an equal opportunity to find their own success. And for this reason, i went into education. I started teaching elementary aged kids, studdied to teach high school aged kids, and ended up in adult leading with fantastic organizations.

Why do you want to work at all?
Do you have to work?
Do you just have to get by or do you want to be wealthy?
Where do you see yourself in 5, 10, 30 years?

I could very well switch gears and end up working in a different field one day. As long as I can justify the reason and have purpose I dont see anything wrong with that. The things you learn and the people you meet along the way will help shape you for whats to come. Have fun out there!
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Ray’s Answer

Ask people what they like about the career they chose and why . Go to a local community college and take various electives and find what is best for you. Sometimes it is trial and error and other times you may find it without expecting it
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Sounak’s Answer

Think, think and think again. You have to find it out yourself. Once you get the answer add a slicing to it "Hard work". Outcome would be enjoy and thrive.
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Matthew’s Answer

A very wealthy investor once said "Don't go finding a job in something you love. Go find something you're good at and make that your career". Best advice I've ever heard. I love to cook, I do it every day for my family. Know what I never want to be? A cook/chef! What am I good at? Really good with numbers and process. And my 20+ years where I work I've used those skills to become not only successful where I work but also respected as people I work with and work for me trust me and (mostly) enjoy working with me.
Oh, and you're not going to have one career! Even if you work in the same place for a long time, if you are eager, curious and generally a hard working person, you will have multiple "mini" careers doing many different things in your overall "career".
0