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What are some questions I should ask on a college tour?

I am going to start touring colleges soon and want to make sure I'm not missing out on information that could really help in choosing which college I want to attend. #college #college-tours

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Amanda’s Answer

Ask about student to teacher ratio, clubs, schedule, and if you can speak to an advisor.
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Alice Foster’s Answer

Hi, Olivia! I would suggest that you take advantage of the college tour to ask questions that you are unable to find answers to on your own. College websites are very extensive and contain a lot of great information on majors, student activities, costs, etc. You will also find that most student tours are two-parters—an informational presentation followed by a student-led tour—and a lot of great data about the school will be relayed in the presentation. Pretty much any question with an objective answer can be answered easily either by looking online or asking questions that have not already been answered at the end of the information session. (Tip: Out of consideration for others, keep questions asked in the large information sessions to broad topics that affect most people in the room; information specific to you or your course of study are best addressed one-on-one by an advisor.)

 

It’s the subjective questions that you’ll want to have at the ready for your campus tour, and having access to the student tour guide for those is key. Student ambassadors want to portray their institutions positively, but they are also usually very candid about their own experiences, and there is time during the walking portions of the tour between the formal talking points to chat with the guide and get an insider’s perspective. How is the food? What res hall would you recommend for freshmen? If you could improve something about campus services, what would it be? Where do students hang out over the weekends?...or anything else that is important to you that you haven't been able to track down elsewhere. One of my favorite questions is If you had a friend visiting, what would you be sure they saw on campus that isn't on the tour? Keep in mind, though, that this is just one student’s opinion, so just use those answers as a jumping-off point, not the final word. At the very least, you might be able to get a good recommendation on where to have lunch!


Take advantage of your time on campus outside of the tour as well. Pay attention to what's on the bulletin boards and the video monitors that announce what's going on on campus. Pick up a copy of the school paper (which you can probably find online, too). Make a point of having lunch or dinner in a residence hall or in the student center to get a feel for what it is like to be there, and make note of how the students around you are interacting. If school pride is important to you, look for whether a lot of students you see are wearing school gear. Part of whether you feel comfortable at a school is pure "chemistry" that isn't going to be the same for everyone, so decide what your priorities are and hone in on those.


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Arun’s Answer

Good to see this question,


*First of all you can see the college placement history and campus interview availabilities for the current students
*Ask them whether Top companies are visiting their campus to recruit the students and see how many students (ratio of students) placing and going for job in that companies
*Ask about the current curriculum is matched with the industry expectation and what are skills you need to develop during your studies to meet the industry expectation
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Abdulghani’s Answer

If you can find a senior student it will help a great deal or ask about the scheduale. Seeing an advisor will be useful. Ask them about resources for your area of study. You may wish to do some background reading on the curriculum and materials. If you can obtain a copy of the curriculum, you will find that this gives an Informative overview of the theory behind each course. Don't miss out to take a good look to the collage to be familiar with and make a list of the key items presented in the collage to make a balancing of the advantages and the disadvantages. If the advantages outweigh the disadvantages then you are in the right place.
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G. Mark’s Answer

Let's get practical and address the reason you're actually in college. First, ask what resources are available if you're having trouble in a course. Second, ask what health resources are available if you have an accident or get sick or have an emergency. Third, ask where there are places on campus you can go to get a solid, uninterrupted period of study. Not just "go to the library", but other places as well.

College is a place for you to get knowledge for life, possibly a career. But it can be wasted if not used constructively. It's pretty easy to spend a lot of time and money in college and accomplish nothing much. Once you've decided what your goals are, bring up each facet you can think of of those particular goals during the tour. Not good places to eat or where the parties are or how to get into the city first, but leave those at the bottom of the priority list. Focus on what's there to help you "get the job done" with the least amount of anxiety.

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Alice Foster’s Answer

Hi, Olivia! I would suggest that you take advantage of the college tour to ask questions that you are unable to find answers to on your own. College websites are very extensive and contain a lot of great information on majors, student activities, costs, etc. You will also find that most student tours are two-parters—an informational presentation followed by a student-led tour—and a lot of great data about the school will be relayed in the presentation. Pretty much any question with an objective answer can be answered easily either by looking online or asking questions that have not already been answered at the end of the information session. (Tip: Out of consideration for others, keep questions asked in the large information sessions to broad topics that affect most people in the room; information specific to you or your course of study are best addressed one-on-one by an advisor.)

 

It’s the subjective questions that you’ll want to have at the ready for your campus tour, and having access to the student tour guide for those is key. Student ambassadors want to portray their institutions positively, but they are also usually very candid about their own experiences, and there is time during the walking portions of the tour between the formal talking points to chat with the guide and get an insider’s perspective. How is the food? What res hall would you recommend for freshmen? If you could improve something about campus services, what would it be? Where do students hang out over the weekends?...or anything else that is important to you that you haven't been able to track down elsewhere. One of my favorite questions is If you had a friend visiting, what would you be sure they saw on campus that isn't on the tour? Keep in mind, though, that this is just one student’s opinion, so just use those answers as a jumping-off point, not the final word. At the very least, you might be able to get a good recommendation on where to have lunch!


Take advantage of your time on campus outside of the tour as well. Pay attention to what's on the bulletin boards and the video monitors that announce what's going on on campus. Pick up a copy of the school paper (which you can probably find online, too). Make a point of having lunch or dinner in a residence hall or in the student center to get a feel for what it is like to be there, and make note of how the students around you are interacting. If school pride is important to you, look for whether a lot of students you see are wearing school gear. Part of whether you feel comfortable at a school is pure "chemistry" that isn't going to be the same for everyone, so decide what your priorities are and hone in on those.


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Kim’s Answer

Hi Olivia, I see some great responses to your question and as an Admissions professional myself, I listed a handful of questions I would ask which you may find useful:

Make sure to ask how accessible professors are to students.
How challenging does the student giving the tour, find the curriculum to be?
Is the school supportive of my desire to change my major and how challenging is it?
How helpful is the Academic Advising Office? Are they easily accessible?
Are students assigned an academic advisor?
How helpful is the Career Services Office? Are they partnered with key companies for internships?
What is the job pacement after graduating?
Do students stay on campus on weekends or do most go home?
Are students involved in organizations on campus? What are the most ones to join?

Good luck!
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Matthew’s Answer

Hey Olivia,


Great question!


Some things to maybe consider:

  • Is the major I'm applying to impacted? Will I be able to get classes and graduate in a timely manner (within 4 years)?
  • What are the different activities I can get involved in? Is there an Office of Student Involvement (or equivalent) that can give me more info on clubs, organizations, greek life, etc.
  • What are the scholarships and programs I can get involved in? Based upon my socio-economic background, are there resources available to me?
  • Study abroad? Opportunities to travel and see the world
  • Campus jobs, campus involvement? Is there a student government, residence hall programs, etc.

For me personally, I wanted to attend a college that was diverse, had lots of programs and history, and that was different than what I was used to growing up.


Good luck!

Matthew recommends the following next steps:

Make a list of the things that are important to you as a person. Do you have experiences or goals that you want to accomplish while in college?
Ask someone who is already a current student to get their perspective
Do your research, figure out what college is best for you academically, socially, fits your budget, etc.
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