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How hard is it to work for a professional sports team?

I have liked sports my whole life and know a lot about it.

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Ashley’s Answer

I began my college career majoring in Sports Management and I graduated with a degree in communications with an emphasis in sports marketing. I volunteered and worked at my colleges athletic department. Unfortunately I was not able to cultivate that in to a career in sports... yet. I did use my knowledge in athletic training to become certified in two states in masssage therapy. When I am asked this question I always reccomend the following: volunteer with the top team or teams on campus, get a job or intership on campus, get to know alumni who work in sports so they can be your champion, and go to events sponsored by the athletic department so you can get the exposure people who work in law, psyc, coaching, history, what ever you can. It is very hard to get into professional sports if you don't let people know who you are. I found that if you try to intern after graduation it is much harder. Pro teams are willing to help with class credit more than using the internship for straigh to hire. Use teamworkonline, go to job fairs and ask questions even if you are not ready to apply yet and look at other jobs to give you other ways to break into the field.

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Karen Wise’s Answer

It's important to study and work in a field that you have a strong interest in, so good for you in discovering your love for sports. There are so many job areas related to sports. You mentioned working for a sports team but even for a team there are so many areas. Let's just pick a professional sport such as football. The NFL association itself has many job types within such as accountants, marketing reps, communications specialist, lawyers, public relations, community outreach, consultants, etc.... Now think about all of the various teams. They have similiar employee needs in addition to team doctors, physical therapists, stadium management, vendor managers, groundskeeping management, etc..... You may be at a great place in your life to ask the next question...."After sports, what else do I like and what else am I good at?" Once you get a few answers to those related questions, you may be able to see some specific areas in sports that also interest you. Here's an example: In addition to loving sports, suppose you discover or determine that you also have very strong math skills and like working with numbers? What direction could this take you? Sports teams need accountants, sports analysts and buyers. These are just 3 but there are more. Challenge yourself to discover more of your interests and skills! Good luck!

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