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I'm wanting to go into Crop Advancement for my major, which is 82% males comapre to female, and I was wondering if I have trouble landing a job being a female in this field?

I was planning in college to try and get an internship with a company with a grain buyer. While getting my major in Crop Advancement, and minor in Farm Management. #agriculture

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Subject: Career question for you

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Thomas’s Answer

The opportunity could be open for anyone no matter your color or race or gender. No one should be discriminated for doing what they love doing.

Thank you comment icon If you are passionate in that field then going in for it will surely bring you distinctive results if you work hard. With that i think your problem will be a problem of choosing a job not looking for one or even creating jobs. Let gender dont be a source of problem gone are those days of intimidation Nkenen
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Maryann’s Answer

Hello Kinley,

I have a BS in Agronomy and an MS in Ag Education from the late '90's. One of my first job interviews, the guy said the starting salary and it was less than I have in student loans at the time (33K), but they wanted someone with a Master's degree. I told him his offer was an insult. Gender inequality is still something you will have to work against regardless of what industry your in. Agriculture is probably slower to change than some, but you need to do some serious investigations on the positions you think you want after college. Google average salaries for the positions (this will be the biggest gender inequality you will face, is salary) and if that doesn't work, get on LinkedIn and connect with people that have the jobs your looking at. Tell them you're a college student doing research on starting salaries across agriculture positions and ask them what the average starting salary is for XXX. Get some internships doing crop consulting, grain buyer or working for a local elevator.  The only way to make a change is to get involved. But do your homework first on the company, position and average salary before you step into any interview after college so that you are prepared to identify inequality if you encounter it. And know your worth! If your top of your class and have internship experience, know what you bring to the table for each company you interview with. Have confidence in the interview, that speaks volumes when dealing with a male prominent industry. 

Maryann recommends the following next steps:

Join LinkedIn and connect with people that have the jobs your interested in.
Reach out to your college advisor regarding helping you to connect with companies for a summer internship. That's part of their job.
Do your research on the companies you interview with after college.
Know your worth and what you bring to the table for each company you interview with.
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patrick’s Answer

what matters is the knowledge you have not gender. gender does not work on its own without knowledge.

Thank you comment icon I've seen a lot more females coming into horticulture and agriculture related jobs, and farming, in the past 2 decades Ramy Elnewehy
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Lynell’s Answer

If you’re hard working and continually looking for opportunities that become available then you should easily be able to find a job.

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Agus’s Answer

iam its good people

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Cate’s Answer

Hello Kinsley! Women in agriculture is on the rise and you should have no concerns about entering this field. In fact, I strongly encourage you to continue! This is an excellent field with many opportunities. Focus on doing well in class and start early with internships in agriculture; don't wait until your junior or senior year in college. Right out of high school get a job with a agriculture coop doing any job; this will familiarize you with terminology and the industry. Have you selected a college?

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Maria’s Answer

Hey , I am a young urban farmer who has worked on farms in New York. I find that big issues are getting paid what I deserve which is more than minimum wage , competing with people with less experience than me for managerial work. I find my age has people think I don’t have experience . I’m going to school to major in horticulture to assure along with my experience I have the credentials.

Maria recommends the following next steps:

Research job reviews , mission statements , and views on women empowerment .
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Bob’s Answer

Hello Kinley,
A career in agriculture can be EEEE-normously satisfying most of the time. Other times (like every career choice) it can be very challenging. Evaluate your strengths (what are you good at?, what do you like?) and your weaknesses (what will you not tolerate?, what do you fear?) as they apply to your career path choice/choices. A Crop Advancement curriculum sound like a sciences heavy choice. Based on your inquiry, you should ask yourself a few questions: "What is it about the Ag science that appeals to you?"; "Why is the ratio of men to women in a particular industry important to you?"; "How will becoming a 'Grain Buyer' ultimately advance your career goals?"; "Where can a career in Farm Management/Crop Advancement ultimately take you?"; "How important is money to you? -- the Ag industry typically works on squeaky (small) margins."
The Ag industry is gigantic. Keep your options open. Question everything!
The world NEEDS more farmers.
All the Best to You.
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Steve’s Answer

I've seen a lot more females coming into horticulture and agriculture related jobs, and farming, in the past 2 decades, and even graduate school. I suspect when the majority of baby boomers have retired, you will see a severe shift in ratios across all farming and agriculture related fields, with a more balanced female:male ratio in most job sectors.


If a company does discriminate against you as a female (doesn't happen often, but may on occasion), you probably don't want that job. I wouldn't want it either as a male, because it means that particular job is good ole boy and politically orientated, and doesn't care about my skill set and experience.

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