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Should I apply to colleges that seem out of reach?

In considering which schools to apply to, I've realized that some schools are definitely reach schools. Is it worth it to apply? #university-applications #college #reach

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Subject: Career question for you

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Ken’s Answer

It really does not matter which college you attend. The important thing is that you make sure that you are following a career area for which you are well suited, do the best that you can to get the best grades that you can, and participate in networking and career experience opportunities that will allow you to become acquainted with and involved with people in your career area of interest. You will be creating connections that will benefit you throughout your education/career journey. During my years in college recruiting, I have encountered too may students who did not take the time and make the effort to follow these steps and ended up in job/career areas for which they were not well suited.

Ken recommends the following next steps:

Here is an interesting video prepared by a person who worked for the admissions department at Stanford. It contains a very important message for anyone considering college: ## http://www.ted.com/talks/julie_lythcott_haims_how_to_raise_successful_kids_without_over_parenting?utm_campaign=social&utm_medium=referral&utm_source=facebook.com&utm_content=talk&utm_term=education ##
Talk to the counseling office at your school to arrange to take an interest and aptitude test, which will allow you to see how your personality traits match with those of people in various career areas.
Talk to the person at your school who tracks and works with graduates of your school to arrange to meet, visit, talk to, and shadow graduates of your school who are doing what look interesting to you based upon the testing. Here are some good tips on getting helpful information: ## http://www.wikihow.com/Network ## ## https://www.themuse.com/advice/nonawkward-ways-to-start-and-end-networking-conversations ## ## https://www.themuse.com/advice/4-questions-to-ask-your-network-besides-can-you-get-me-a-job?ref=carousel-slide-1 ##
Selecting a college is like selecting any other investment opportunity. You need select an option that will allow you to get the greatest return with the least but prudent investment. Many people have found that a beginning at the local community college is a great start towards a fulfilling career. The tuition is more reasonable than most colleges, the class sizes are smaller, the support systems are very good, and they have coop and internship opportunities that will allow for career exploration and familiarization as you get your education - which is very important and you can earn and learn and get practical exposure to your area of interest. Talk to the Director of Alumni Relations at your local community college to arrange to talk to graduates of that school who re dong what you think that you want to do.
As college can be very expensive, it is very important to look at ways to economize your education. Here are some helpful tips: ## http://www.educationplanner.org/students/paying-for-school/ways-to-pay/reduce-college-costs.shtml ##
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Shiri’s Answer

I believe that you should definitely apply for a college that you don't think that you necessarily qualify for, as long as it's a college that you want to go to. Some colleges, just like companies, will take you as long as they can see that you have the qualities that they look for, like being hard working and willing to learn. There are 3 levels of colleges that you should apply to: safety schools, dream schools, and the school that's kind of in the middle.
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Nicole’s Answer

Hi Ashley N. I see that you posted this question a little while ago so I hope my answer to you (or others who may read this response) is still helpful.

In addition to the awesome answers provided, I ask that one consider "how awesome is it going to be when I get accepted to this school/program" vs "what if I don't get in"...in other words, framing your expectations that any school you apply to is within reach, can help individuals to keep an open mind both in the application process and in your college journey.

Best of luck to you!
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