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Is it smarter to get scholarships for instate or out of state colleges?

I have offers for scholarships out of state, and even though out of state tuition costs more. Is it better to use the money and get my schooling done there instead of paying for instate. #payingforcollege #needmoney #instate #outofstate

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Kelly’s Answer

Your choice entirely hinges on your current location and your intended destination. Having earned five degrees and two postgraduate certificates, I've experienced the education systems in Connecticut, Massachusetts, Florida, North Dakota, and Ohio. Interestingly, while residing in Connecticut, I found that the tuition fees in Florida, North Dakota, and Ohio were significantly lower, even including the out-of-state rates. In this context, it was more economical to offset the basic tuition fees with scholarships and employer tuition contributions than to remain in a New England state.

However, making such a decision involves considering numerous factors. You should ponder questions like: Are you open to relocating? Is it feasible for you to complete your coursework entirely online? Are there special financial aids or grants available for non-residents? For me, these questions were simple to answer as I was focused on the curriculum, the institution, and the program I desired. Similarly, I would encourage you to consider which state offers the curriculum, schedule, and major that align best with your preferences.
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Daniel’s Answer

This question is not possible to answer without more information:

  • Does the scholarship money completely make up for the difference?
  • Is cost of living expense going to be significantly higher at one of the colleges?
  • What are the relative strengths of the schools? (potentially for the specific degree program)
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Gloria’s Answer

Hi Jadyn,

I would say that you should try for scholarships that give you the widest options for what schools you want to attend. And then you have to assess how the money is best used for you. For many four year programs, the first two years of college are just basic classes. You can often earn the college credits you need a community college rather than a bigger school. Your challenge of a community college is are those credits transferable to the four year university you want to graduate from, in-state or out-of-state. These are questions that you need to have answered to work out the financials of any college plan, whether you get scholarships or not.

Gloria
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