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Is it difficult on you if you don’t take college classes in high school ?

When you’re in college is it harder if you don’t have college level classes in high school? #high-school #college

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Simeon’s Answer

Honestly, high school AP/Dual Credit classes are way more difficult than almost any of the classes that you'll take in university. You should take those college-level high school courses because they'll help you graduate sooner, but you're not going to have a more difficult college experience if you don't.
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Gwen Hardin,’s Answer

Hi Christian,

You do not necessarily need to take college level classes in order to prepare yourself for college. If you want to challenge yourself and want to feel more prepared in areas of math and science for college then taking college level classes would be good for you. If you are struggling in certain subjects in high school, I would concentrate more on strengthening your grades in that subject as colleges look at your overall academic performance. Hope this helps.

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Nicole’s Answer

Hi Christian H. I see that you posted this question a little while ago so I hope my answer to you (or others who may read this response) is still helpful.

I share with you a couple of facts in my experience. I did not take college level classes while I was in high school. I attended and graduated from an Ivy League university. I obtained an engineering degree from my university. And yes, there were times when my work at school was very hard.

I share these facts, in a way, to echo the previous answer provided. What can make college courses difficult may not be tied, at all, to previous high school courses. It could be that the college courses are just...hard. That the concepts are new and sometimes new concepts are a challenge to understand...at first. I did my best to utilize as many resources as possible while I was in college. This included my professor's or teaching assistant's office hours, study groups, etc.

I also suggest that while in high school, do your very best to get the best grades possible by building good, lasting study habits and knowing when/how to give your brain a break. I think, over time, you will find that the difficulty of your subjects will level off and/or decrease as your knowledge base grows.

Best of luck to you!
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Nicole’s Answer

Hi Christian H. I see that you posted this question a little while ago so I hope my answer to you (or others who may read this response) is still helpful.

I share with you a couple of facts in my experience. I did not take college level classes while I was in high school. I attended and graduated from an Ivy League university. I obtained an engineering degree from my university. And yes, there were times when my work at school was very hard.

I share these facts, in a way, to echo the previous answer provided. What can make college courses difficult may not be tied, at all, to previous high school courses. It could be that the college courses are just...hard. That the concepts are new and sometimes new concepts are a challenge to understand...at first. I did my best to utilize as many resources as possible while I was in college. This included my professor's or teaching assistant's office hours, study groups, etc.

I also suggest that while in high school, do your very best to get the best grades possible by building good, lasting study habits and knowing when/how to give your brain a break. I think, over time, you will find that the difficulty of your subjects will level off and/or decrease as your knowledge base grows.

Best of luck to you!
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