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What are the best tools to study for SATs?

#SATs #studying

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Lexi’s Answer

Hi Mia!


One of the easiest ways to prepare yourself for the SAT is to complete the extra practice tests that the College Board provides on their website. They have 8 tests and answers available, so there is a good amount of material. Another free resource is Khan Academy, though I think their tests might be the same ones as the College Board's website.


Other than that, if you have the available income, I would recommend looking into SAT prep books on Amazon. Usually you can find a copy of the previous years' books from companies like Kaplan Test Prep and The Princeton Review for a little less than the sticker price.


And if you are looking for more guidance, there are always tutoring or class packages from those same companies that you could look into, though that can be pricey.


Good luck!

Lexi


Link to College Board: <span style="color: rgb(0, 0, 0);">https://collegereadiness.collegeboard.org/sat/practice/full-length-practice-tests#</span>

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Christine’s Answer

Hi Mia,

One word: NOTECARDS. Any test like the SAT can be studied for. Look for mock exams and practice questions online. Make sure you understand the basics of all the topics then buy a few packs of note cards (I think the physical version is more beneficial than digital) and write the questions on one side and the answers on the other. Then copy, copy, copy. Write out about 5 questions and try to answer them from memory. If you can't then flip over the card and write out the answer. Go back and read them out loud to yourself until you can answer the questions without looking at the answers. Repeat. Rote memorisation will get you very far on standardised tests.

For your own comfort however, study general conceptual theories of each subject area as well and...this next part is very important...READ. Read everything you can get your hands on. Read novels. Read the news --but not too much ;). Read plays. Read film scripts. Read websites. Read labels. Read...everything. Being secure in your vocabulary will free up your mind to memorise other things like mathematical concepts.

Best of luck!

--Christine
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