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What do I need to do to get Hvac?

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John R.’s Answer

I wear several of the preverbal hats in the industry and mechanical trades. One of this is an instructor in the filed for the past, well... longing-time. As a previous poster said and I will quote "commitment to lifelong learning and a teachable attitude are really important" This is not important it is paramount!!

In seeking an education in the field, first explore community college option before going into debit. These provide by far the best value, per dollar / hour of education costs. Many of the for profit companies are grant and student loan focused. With tuition costs ranging from 18-30K in the tri-state are of Southeast PA, South Jersey and Delaware. At the end of the program their wages are still the same as students graduating from a Community College.

To develop a mid to high proficiency, I tell students that they need to invest in themselves and on their own time about 1/3 of the classroom time. Meaning that if the program they are enrolled is 6 hours per week, then 2 hours studying and reinforcing the classroom lectures. Regardless of the instructors assignments. The reason is only 8-10% will be retained if not reinforced.

Remember. Those sitting along side you in a class are all your competition for jobs! IN the job market you need to stand above the rest by demonstrating the added value you will bring to an organization.

Other options are apprenticeships, ideally entering a program that is sponsored or approved by the Department of Labor in the state you reside, other options are organized labor apprenticeships.

Best wishes in career pursuits.
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Timothy’s Answer

Trade school is not necessary for this job, being willing to work, and buy the necessary tools if hired is very important. Talk to managers at local companies about apprentice/helper positions. You want to know what the job is line before you invest in schooling. Epa certification, tools and a tdlr registered technician card along with a commitment to lifelong learning and a teachable attitude are really important.
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Alex’s Answer

Obtain all the industry necessary tools, for example. Gauges, hand tools, drill, valve wrench, etc. I would recommend applying for jobs as an install helper. This will get you an entry level position in the field and give you some great hands on experience. It is much easier to understand topics in class when your working in the industry. It gives you a better understanding of what your learning about. You will need your epa certification to be able to purchase and transport refrigerant. Epa exams are usually administered by Hvac supply houses for around $100. The best advice I can give you is to get a job in the industry and gain an understanding of all the components of an ac system. Ask your mentor lots of questions!!!! I hope this helps and wish you the best of luck.
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John R.’s Answer

I wear several of the preverbal hats in the industry and mechanical trades. One of this is an instructor in the filed for the past, well... longing-time. As a previous poster said and I will quote "commitment to lifelong learning and a teachable attitude are really important" This is not important it is paramount!!

In seeking an education in the field, first explore community college option before going into debit. These provide by far the best value, per dollar / hour of education costs. Many of the for profit companies are grant and student loan focused. With tuition costs ranging from 18-30K in the tri-state are of Southeast PA, South Jersey and Delaware. At the end of the program their wages are still the same as students graduating from a Community College.

To develop a mid to high proficiency, I tell students that they need to invest in themselves and on their own time about 1/3 of the classroom time. Meaning that if the program they are enrolled is 6 hours per week, then 2 hours studying and reinforcing the classroom lectures. Regardless of the instructors assignments. The reason is only 8-10% will be retained if not reinforced.

Remember. Those sitting along side you in a class are all your competition for jobs! IN the job market you need to stand above the rest by demonstrating the added value you will bring to an organization.

Other options are apprenticeships, ideally entering a program that is sponsored or approved by the Department of Labor in the state you reside, other options are organized labor apprenticeships.

Best wishes in career pursuits.
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Steven’s Answer

Juan, you asked, what do I need to get HVAC.
A career in HVAC has many opportunities. There are three main paths.
First if you want to be a serviced technician, you can get on the job training as well as attend a vocational school. You will learn heat transfer and refrigeration. You will learn a working knowledge of electrical systems. You will learn how to work safe. No math is required. Skills in trouble shooting and using small tools will be taught. You will learn how to service and install a vast array of equipment such as small appliances like ice machines, as well as large equipment such as chillers. Within nine months, you could be working alone on smaller equipment, or working along side a more experienced person on larger equipment. It is very satisfying to know you have fixed something using your troubleshooting skills.

Second, you could get an associates degree in or a 4 year bachelor of science degree where you learn heat transfer and computer drafting.
You would work with a engineers on designs for HVAC systems which are used to heat and cool. You would start drawing from sketches and equipment submittals. Eventually you would gain enough experience to design small projects yourself. You might be able to go into the field and see the installations to see if they were installed correctly. Very little math is required. It is an office job with schedules and budgets to adhere to. Each project you do, will add to your knowledge and you will get satisfaction from designing systems that will help people realize their dreams.

Third, you could become an engineer. It takes a bachelor of science in engineering, or an accredited engineering technology degree. Either degree should allow you to become a PE. A PE starts their career out as a designer working for another engineer for a period of at least 4 years. An engineering degree is heavy in math, and physics. Becoming a PE allows you to stamp drawings for permits. Typically a PE wears many hats. They may market for the company, write proposals, do cost estimates for construction and engineering costs. Meet with the client, put together a preliminary design showing on paper how you propose to meet the clients goals. For instance, it may be a chiller system, vs a DX system. Engineers produce plans and specifications. You would work with a designer to get your ideas on paper in enough detail that a contractor can bid on the project and install it. You specify all the mechanical equipment and write the specifications outlining minimum standards, code compliance and installation instructions. You write a sequence of operations for how you want the system controls to operate. You work with other electrical engineers, structural engineers, architects and project managers. You attend progress meetings and track budget and schedule. Once the project is awarded to a contractor to build, you work with that contractor answering questions from the field. You review shop drawing to ensure the equipment meets your requirements. Working with a team of professionals is a very rewarding experience. The opportunities in HVAC are many, since HVAC is the heart of keeping any building running, from Hospitals to Schools and office buildings.

Steven recommends the following next steps:

Go to the library and research HVAC trades and engineering careers.
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Updated Translate

Steven’s Answer

Juan, you asked, what do I need to get HVAC.
A career in HVAC has many opportunities. There are three main paths.
First if you want to be a serviced technician, you can get on the job training as well as attend a vocational school. You will learn heat transfer and refrigeration. You will learn a working knowledge of electrical systems. You will learn how to work safe. No math is required. Skills in trouble shooting and using small tools will be taught. You will learn how to service and install a vast array of equipment such as small appliances like ice machines, as well as large equipment such as chillers. Within nine months, you could be working alone on smaller equipment, or working along side a more experienced person on larger equipment. It is very satisfying to know you have fixed something using your troubleshooting skills.

Second, you could get an associates degree in or a 4 year bachelor of science degree where you learn heat transfer and computer drafting.
You would work with a engineers on designs for HVAC systems which are used to heat and cool. You would start drawing from sketches and equipment submittals. Eventually you would gain enough experience to design small projects yourself. You might be able to go into the field and see the installations to see if they were installed correctly. Very little math is required. It is an office job with schedules and budgets to adhere to. Each project you do, will add to your knowledge and you will get satisfaction from designing systems that will help people realize their dreams.

Third, you could become an engineer. It takes a bachelor of science in engineering, or an accredited engineering technology degree. Either degree should allow you to become a PE. A PE starts their career out as a designer working for another engineer for a period of at least 4 years. An engineering degree is heavy in math, and physics. Becoming a PE allows you to stamp drawings for permits. Typically a PE wears many hats. They may market for the company, write proposals, do cost estimates for construction and engineering costs. Meet with the client, put together a preliminary design showing on paper how you propose to meet the clients goals. For instance, it may be a chiller system, vs a DX system. Engineers produce plans and specifications. You would work with a designer to get your ideas on paper in enough detail that a contractor can bid on the project and install it. You specify all the mechanical equipment and write the specifications outlining minimum standards, code compliance and installation instructions. You write a sequence of operations for how you want the system controls to operate. You work with other electrical engineers, structural engineers, architects and project managers. You attend progress meetings and track budget and schedule. Once the project is awarded to a contractor to build, you work with that contractor answering questions from the field. You review shop drawing to ensure the equipment meets your requirements. Working with a team of professionals is a very rewarding experience. The opportunities in HVAC are many, since HVAC is the heart of keeping any building running, from Hospitals to Schools and office buildings.

Steven recommends the following next steps:

Go to the library and research HVAC trades and engineering careers.
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