7 answers

Should i continue with welding

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I love to draw #shade

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100% of 7 Pros

7 answers

Heather’s Answer

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Hi Devin,
Why not do both - explore both options and continue to develop both skills. There is nothing wrong with learning as much as possible and continuing to develop all of your talents. Welding is kind of difficult when you first begin (especially if youre starting on oxyacetylene - but all forms of welding present their own challenges in the beginning - I promise it gets easier). Learning these skills may have application to your artwork later if you enjoy making 3D sculptures. There are a lot of interesting things you can make as a result of being good at welding. Welding is really the doorway into fabrication - if you end up liking it, you should continue to learn more tools - how to finish metal and maybe even try wood. Fabrication for professional artwork is a huge career field. The more materials and skills you have the better. Does this sound like something you would enjoy? If so, I would keep up both. The more skills you have in the art world, the more competitive and valued of an asset you become! If you really are unsure, maybe look into different companies that need good welders and fabricators. Here are a few you can check out:

Technique Architectural Products: https://www.techniqueap.com/ They built the ball that drops on New Years in Pittsburgh a couple of years ago!
Atomic Props: https://www.atomicprops.com/portfolio/
VStar Entertainment: http://www.vstarentertainment.com/portfolio

All of these require welding skills and more! You're starting young that's a huge benefit. Entry level pay for these type of jobs are around 15 dollars an hour, given you have the skills required. If you want to learn more, you can probably learn a lot at a local Makerspace and learn even more about the benefits of learning all these skills!

Initially when I started out in art, I really only worked with drawing and painting. When I discovered 3D art everything changed. If you enjoy drawing, no one says you have to stop drawing -even if you are welding. You can do both. Both require practice. I encourage you to stick with it and talk to people in the sculpture field (especially if you do not want to do functional welding) to learn more about all the amazing things you can do if you continue to develop your skills in working with steel (and maybe aluminum and bronze and maybe even other materials).

I wish you the best and I hope you stick with both and seek to learn as much as you can and gain as many skills as you possibly can.

Heather recommends the following next steps:

  • Check the websites I suggested
  • Think about what you might do and what other skills might interest you!
  • Visit a Makerspace in the local area (just google Makerspace and the name of your city)
  • Keep asking questions!
  • Dont give up!
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Heather’s Answer

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Updated
Hi Devin,
Why not do both - explore both options and continue to develop both skills. There is nothing wrong with learning as much as possible and continuing to develop all of your talents. Welding is kind of difficult when you first begin (especially if youre starting on oxyacetylene - but all forms of welding present their own challenges in the beginning - I promise it gets easier). Learning these skills may have application to your artwork later if you enjoy making 3D sculptures. There are a lot of interesting things you can make as a result of being good at welding. Welding is really the doorway into fabrication - if you end up liking it, you should continue to learn more tools - how to finish metal and maybe even try wood. Fabrication for professional artwork is a huge career field. The more materials and skills you have the better. Does this sound like something you would enjoy? If so, I would keep up both. The more skills you have in the art world, the more competitive and valued of an asset you become! If you really are unsure, maybe look into different companies that need good welders and fabricators. Here are a few you can check out:

Technique Architectural Products: https://www.techniqueap.com/ They built the ball that drops on New Years in Pittsburgh a couple of years ago!
Atomic Props: https://www.atomicprops.com/portfolio/
VStar Entertainment: http://www.vstarentertainment.com/portfolio

All of these require welding skills and more! You're starting young that's a huge benefit. Entry level pay for these type of jobs are around 15 dollars an hour, given you have the skills required. If you want to learn more, you can probably learn a lot at a local Makerspace and learn even more about the benefits of learning all these skills!

Initially when I started out in art, I really only worked with drawing and painting. When I discovered 3D art everything changed. If you enjoy drawing, no one says you have to stop drawing -even if you are welding. You can do both. Both require practice. I encourage you to stick with it and talk to people in the sculpture field (especially if you do not want to do functional welding) to learn more about all the amazing things you can do if you continue to develop your skills in working with steel (and maybe aluminum and bronze and maybe even other materials).

I wish you the best and I hope you stick with both and seek to learn as much as you can and gain as many skills as you possibly can.

Heather recommends the following next steps:

  • Check the websites I suggested
  • Think about what you might do and what other skills might interest you!
  • Visit a Makerspace in the local area (just google Makerspace and the name of your city)
  • Keep asking questions!
  • Dont give up!
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Brett’s Answer

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Updated
To answer this pretty clearly. What is your passion? Do you want a job that pays a lot of money or do you want a sense of personal accomplishment? There's no right or wrong answer here, because we would like both. The idea you should be immersing yourself with is what will make you feel full. If your passion is drawing great! There are many different lines of work that will welcome you. Graphic design, freelance, animator, ect. Your skills are boundless. Practice is inevitable even for veterans in the field, and constructive criticism is always there to help you advance. Since you're a welder and this is most likely paying the bills go to school and learn more about art, drawing, and the socialism that pertains to this field. If it's to your liking then start applying it to your current job, or ween away and start producing products that people will buy from you.

Brett recommends the following next steps:

  • Go back to school.
  • Learn from other artist. Adapt their work into your own style.
  • Go to an art gallery and eventualy create your own.
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Kim’s Answer

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Devin,
You need to continue drawing, don't ever stop. At the same time, you need to continue your vocational training which will provide you a handsome income and allow you to pursue the life of an Artist.

When I ask you about the importance of Piccasso, you might tell me that he invented cubism or that he was a neorealist, and you may know many pieces of paintings, Paccasso produce, 30-volumes in his life time. I am sure that you can quote me the names of one or two paintings, you also might even know of the volume of his work.

Thing is Piccasso worked as all of the following: a painter, a sculptor, a printmaker, a ceramicist, a stage designer, a poet, and a playwright. He made a living to support his art with the talents he had.

You draw to produce your welding don't you? Do you create with your welding as well? Something you should consider. Go to the followig link to see what I mean: https://www.facebook.com/pyramid.welding/photos. All of his work comes from drawings that this welder creates.
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AAron’s Answer

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Never stop drawing, or welding. Welding is a great way to be financially sound. I would encourage you to branch out and try as many art forms, mediums as you can possibly find and try. I have done art my whole life. I still do art today, incorporating all sorts of knowledge from art, as well as regular life will help steer you into the direction of your art. I would recommend dating all work or some how identify what you have done, so you can look back to where you were. Reach out and watch others work, and see what new techniques are out there. most important thing... do it because you like it, and want to do it.

AAron recommends the following next steps:

  • try doing some wood working
  • try ceramics
  • try different fiber work
  • draw with never before used tools and techniques
  • watch as many different you tube videos of people doing different types of art
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Sherry’s Answer

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Devin,

Do you like desk jobs or shop jobs? I like art as well. I have worked in automotive and did my art as a hobby. I do get my drawing in and modeling on the computer in NX. I worked in the steel mill as a young adult but I'm now looking to retire. As a young person I liked factory work but as I got older it's nice to have an office job. Welding is hard on you after while and is a physical job. So if you work in welding and you collect a wage keep at it but look for something in a office environment. Clay modelers, computer aided design and pattern makers. Office work isn't for everyone.
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Natarie’s Answer

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Whatever You feel is good for your need.
Hi Natarie, any elaboration on how someone can know if something is good for them would be helpful. Insights on making that decision in the field of welding would also be appreciated. Gurpreet Lally
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