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how many years you have to go to college to become a teacher?

i love dancing,i love giving good advice i love everything.I wanna become a teacher. #teaching

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JOSEPH’s Answer

Normally a Bachelors Degree is required and I recommend getting into a school district as an interim or volunteer opportunity through the summer.

Pick a school that specializes in education.
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Dave’s Answer

Hi!

It does depend on what state you live in and where you want to teach. Public schools require a teaching license or credential, while many private and charter schools may not require a credential to teach. It looks like you are in Tennessee. I found this link, which may help you determine what kind of license you would need: https://www.tn.gov/content/tn/education/licensing/educator-licensure/new-to-education.html

When I decided I wanted to become a teacher, I first looked around for volunteer opportunities in the classroom. I actually went back to my old high school and spent some time volunteering with teachers. I also went to an elementary school. I strongly recommend this because, you will get a chance to see if it's something you really want to do before you make the commitment. (Obviously with COVID, this will be more difficult, but there still should be some opportunities to volunteer)

I obtained a teaching credential in California. I had already gotten a college degree in an unrelated field, and then enrolled in a specific credential program at a university. It was a 12 month intensive training that included two different student teaching opportunities. It culminated in taking the credentialing test and becoming certified. Once again, every state is different and has different prerequisite education requirements.

While I'm no longer a teacher, I'm happy that I was for some time. Good luck!
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Bryce’s Answer

Hi Dantavia,

In most states full time teachers are only required to have a bachelors degree. To gain a bachelors degree it usually takes about 4 years, sometimes a little less sometimes a little more, just depends on how many classes you take each semester. For the most part the degree can be in anything, but if you don't complete a teacher prep program you may have to take additional classes. Lastly, if you don't go through a teacher prep program you will have to take certification test usually within the first 3-5 years of teaching. You still have to take certification exams in teacher prep programs, but usually you take them over the course of your program.
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Cameren’s Answer

In order to become a teacher you will spend several years in school and obtaining licensure. The first step is to earn admission into and complete an undergraduate program, earning your Bachelor's degree. This usually takes four years, although some are able to complete it in three and others take five years. Many universities offer specializations for education and you should make sure that your university and program is accredited by CAEP.

During your time before becoming a teacher, you are usually placed in a classroom with your mentor teacher to gain a better understanding and hands on experience working with children and in the classroom. This placement can last up to a year. You will also have to apply for state licensure and in many cases teachers go on to pursue master's degree or additional specialized licensure.

So for a time frame, I would say the minimum time you should expect it to take to become a teacher is 5 years but the process can definitely go beyond that. I hope this was helpful.
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Patricia R’s Answer

Dantavia,
I can see lots of good advice and suggestions from the previous respondents about how and where to get more information.

With your future in mind, make sure the program in which you enroll has early and frequent in-classroom experiences (field study), so you get a realistic feel of what it’s like to be a teacher and/or at which grade level you would like to teach.


So – my suggestions are these:

• Apply to a program that is peppered with field experiences from the beginning and throughout your entire program. You will be much better prepared to step into your first days as a teacher. (This will also look better on your transcript if you need to become certified/licensed in another district or state.)
• Look for and enroll in a college/university that has a high-ranking teacher education program. (Many small colleges are excellent! And less expensive than the big-name universities.)
• Volunteer to be with children as an instructor of some type (in your community). Vacation Bible Studies, summer camp counselor, volunteer sports instructor at your local pool or sports complex, etc. (I was a very good swimmer but not as a competitor, so, in exchange for pool privileges, I worked with 5-and 6-year olds who were afraid of the water. It was slow and very difficult, but we all ended up with more confidence.)
• If you are not assigned one, look for a good teacher to be a mentor. Ask around, find someone who is respected, and introduce yourself. Ask if you can shadow them as they teach, write down questions you’d like to discuss, and then talk with the teacher.

Whether it takes 4 years (without interruptions) or longer, I wish you the good fortune!
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Alison’s Answer

Hi Dantavia,
Good for you! Teaching is a hugely important profession. Requirements for teaching certifications vary by state, so as you’re checking out different colleges, ask them how long the teaching certification program is in your state (or more accurately, the state you want to teach in). Unfortunately, that does mean that there is not just one simple, short answer to your question.

I’m originally from New York. Getting my teaching license there meant doing a regular 4 year undergraduate degree (BA) with a major in the subject I wanted to teach. My college set up their teaching courses so that you were basically completing a double major: classes in the subject you’d teach and classes in educational psychology, theory, and methodology. I also took all of my certification exams while I was an undergrad. All of that allowed me to get my temporary, provisional certification. In order to get a permanent certification, I was then required to get a Master’s degree (MA), which is usually a 2 year program, and then teach for a few years.

Getting your teaching certificate in one state doesn’t necessarily mean you can teach in any state, however. Some states have what’s called “reciprocity” with each other, which means that the state will accept your teaching license even though you earned it in another state (I live and work in Massachusetts now, for example). But sometimes if you get your teaching license in one state and then move to another, you’ll have to take an exam or complete some other form of recertification process in your new state.

I hope this information helps. And good luck to you in your future career!
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