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How many times do you have to go on an interview to get a job?

Greetings! I'm Ms. Brown at the International Community School. My 2nd graders have a few questions and I'd like to share your advice with them. Thanks in advance!

#interviewing #jobs

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Manda’s Answer

Most professional jobs have a multi-step hiring process. It usually starts with a resume screen, then a phone interview, then between one and three in-person interviews. If you get to the interview stage at multiple jobs, you'll end up doing a lot of interviews! In the last year, my company has been doing virtual interviews through video conferencing software (i.e. Zoom). Our candidates do a phone interview, then a video interview with the hiring manager, then a video interview with 3 other people from the company. In general, entry-level jobs (for example, to work at a restaurant) might only require one interview, but more technical or professional jobs (such as to be a software engineer or a manager) will require two or more interviews.
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Kimberly’s Answer

Hi. It depends on what type of job you're interviewing for. Most professional job usually have a phone interview and an in-person interview. Most people have to apply to several jobs before they get an interview. The best thing to do is PREPARE for the interview. Think about what kind of questions you might get asked and try to come up with answers and examples before going into the interview.

Kimberly recommends the following next steps:

Chat with older cousins or family members and ask them what did to get the job and what kind of questions did they ask you.
Thank you comment icon Kimberly offers great advice. I'll add that expressing your interest in the job can go a long way with the interviewer. You never want to assume the interviewer knows how interested you are in the position. Its best to express your interest upfront and clearly. Best of luck! Claudio Alvarez
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Kelly’s Answer

Great question and quite insightful for 2nd graders! Some of my colleagues answered this just as I would but to add to being prepared, I would also encourage interviewers to follow the STAR Method when preparing their interviews . This stands for S- situation, T-task, A-action and R-results. I find this method really helps candidates to give an answer that doesn't require much probing from the interviewer and clearly tells a robust story to answer whatever point the interviewer is trying to gather. Hope this helps!
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Sahil’s Answer

Hello, I have applied for tech jobs in the sales space for the last 4 years through internships and full time jobs. For me, they all started off with a phone screen that lasts typically 15-30 minutes to get a better sense of me and my experience history on my resume. From there, a 30 minute zoom call with your camera on will be the most normal practice followed by either another 30-45 minute zoom call. After that round, you typically are in a second round of candidates that are assigned to a panel interview where you usually have a roleplay of the product with a customer conversation or presentation of some sort. This is my experience for a BDR/SDR role at a tech company.


Hope this helps, thanks!
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Yasmine’s Answer

In my professional experience, I've had to go through multiple interviews before getting the job. At the least, I've done three interviews. At the most, I've done seven. Good luck to your students!
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Gabby’s Answer

Hi Ms. Brown,

Your 2nd graders are very inquisitive! As mentioned previously, it will depend on the type of industry and position you've applied for. In my experience, I've typically seen 1-2 for service industry roles and 3-5 in corporate positions, but as many as 8. Occasionally I've experienced the causal interview, more talking and getting to know one another or the behavioral based interviews with set questions. In addition, I've seen the process last from a few weeks to several months, depending on the role. There are also different types of interviews, from phone, video or in person to panel interviews (an interview with more than 1 hiring manager, typically 2-3).

I've also found it appropriate when a candidate asks me "what does the interview process look like?" This question is helpful because it can give you, as the candidate, an idea of what to expect the process to look like, so you can prepare and understanding timing. Good luck educating our future candidates!

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Manoj’s Answer

Number of times you have to go for an interview depends on how many people want to listen and talk to you . Sometimes the interview could be just one interview with say 4 people in the room talking with you. We call that a 'group' interview. Each person in the room with you can ask questions to you . Sometimes, the interview could be just 1:1 where only one person talks with you and tries to understand you better . For most jobs, you should always be prepared to interview with 3-4 people .
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Corinne’s Answer

As you have noticed, the answer is "it depends." It depends on the kind of job, the company, and the direct supervisor. Things like the difficulty of the job or the supervisor's personality can all be so different. I have been through 4 interviews for one position and also have been hired from just 1 interview.
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James’s Answer

As folks have said above, depending on the job, it can take between 1-2,- 5+.

For 2 years, I was a college recruiter for a a large tech company. I would go on campus and recruit students to become System Engineers and Accountants. First, I would pre screen resumes of the potential pool of applicants. I would then go on campus the night before my interviews and have an "information session". I would show a video of our company and then answer any questions the students had.

The next day I would have 13- 30 minute on campus interviews. During those interviews, I would quickly figure out if I wanted to see them again.

Skills I was looking for were:

Had done research on my company and job.
Did they come to my information session?
Presented themselves well - Articulate
Good listener
Been involved in activities outside of class
Maybe had a job in college
Been part of organization/club in college that allowed them to work with others and lead.
Maybe had struggled first year of college but had finished strong (Improved over 4 years)

After awhile, I could tell in first 10 minutes if I was going to ask them for a second interview.

I then invited them to the follow up interview, typically near their college and at a location of potential client of company.

There it was diving deeper into their background to understand their passions and what made them tick.
Did they have good follow up questions and a good understanding of my company and job.
If I felt OK, I would pass along to the hiring manager.

He/she would have a 1-2 hour interview and making hiring decision.

These recent graduates would then go through a 2 year System Engineering training program. (Both on client site and in class room).


So, for my company, hiring recent college graduates, it what 3-4.

I hope that helps give another perspective.

James

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Katelyn’s Answer

Each position will likely have a different interview process. The more experienced a role is, the more likely it is that there will be multiple interviews and/or interviewers involved in the process. There are different interview formats that can include 1 interviewer to 1 candidate, panel formats that can include multiple interviewers to one candidate, or group interviews which include multiple candidates and multiple interviewers. I echo the advice that no matter the format, the best thing you can do for an interview is to prepare. Think back on your skillset and examples and come prepared to discuss those.
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Albanitza’s Answer

Hello! It depends on the company and the jobs they are applying for. Some may have a phone screen and multiple virtual or in person interviews. Others may have a panel style interview process. Always remember your audience and be prepared with some behavioral based responses using the BAR or STAR format.
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