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What does it take to graduate with a Masters Degree majoring in Business?

I plan on attending college when I return from the navy but I still haven't decided on whether what school I should attend or even which major I should choose. business-analysis career-planning

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Scott’s Answer

Elias -

Typically your "Master's Degree" or Graduate Degree is an advanced degree that you can earn after your initial Undergraduate Degree (think 4 year college program.) A Master's Degree in Business would be focused around all advanced business classes whereas your undergraduate degree would have some initial business classes along with other courses and different electives to make you a more well rounded individual.

Many Master's programs are either 1 or 2 additional years of study beyond the 4 years for your undergraduate degree. These additional years can come right after your undergraduate degree, but often times people work for a few years first. Having real world experience can let you see the Business topics in a whole new light when studying for your Masters. Master's Programs can also be designed to be full-time or in conjunction with a full-time job. These are often called Executive Programs and can put you in class with other working professionals which can really help build your network.

Best of Luck with your choice and Thank You for your service.

Scott
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Megan’s Answer

You do not need an undergraduate in business to get your MBA. You will likely find that a lot of your peers are getting their MBA as a better way to marry technical expertise with business process expertise. I myself have an undergraduate BS degree in molecular biology. When I did my MBA 3 years ago, I had lots of fellow returning grads who were engineers, chemists, medical (nurses, lab techs), and even a homeschool baker wanting to open her own bakery!

A overall MBA in my opinion is kind of like a very broad certificate. There is no one job/field that it is linked to, but it makes you more valuable to any number of businesses because you will have a good understanding of the structure of other departments besides your own.

Aside from the main category of courses I had, there was room for a few specialized classes. Use those to focus on what field you want to be especially valuable to. For instance, there was a course focused on IT improvements and change management. That was a great course to take that remains relevant even though I have switched to a different job.

Best of luck in your learnings! Thank you for your service!
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Allan’s Answer

Thank you for your service.
Many businesses need people who can work with data. This means knowing how to prepare data for analysis, analyzing the data, drawing conclusions and being able to share those conclusions in an easy to understand way. You will probably need these skills in a graduate business course. It will ease your way if you start to learn these skills in advance. But I expect you can also take classes on working with data in a graduate program.
Good luck!
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De'andra’s Answer

To narrow your career path, start by figuring out what you love to do (time flies when you're doing it) and what others confirm you are good at doing. MarcusBuckingham.com offers a free assessment that helps with this, although there are plenty out there (DISC, Myers-Briggs, etc). It's also important to find your "why". Simon Sinek wrote an entire book about it which I recommend.
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