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In which types of environments can someone get a job as a chef?

I want to be a chef. What are the types of workplaces that will hire a chef? #hospitality #personal-chef

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ROBIN’s Answer

The obvious job search for a chef would be restaurants. Yet, there are many other possibilities such as nursing homes, hospitals, corporate settings, professional athletic teams, schools, caterers, cruise ships, resorts and lodges and probably even more.

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Scott’s Answer

You have your traditional roles-restaurants, hotels, gastro-pubs, etc.
These pay ok, depending on what the cost of living is in the area that you're working. Although, don't expect to make a lot unless you are the top dog, and are also work 60+hours a week. Most of the time these places don't include benefits, but will have plenty of over-time hours. If you want a little more employee rights be in a state like California, you will actually be aloud work breaks, not that you'll use them per say.

Non traditional- Private Chef, Corporate Chef/cook, Teaching Chef, Catering Chef
Once you've done your time in a traditional role, you might find yourself working in more of the Private Sector. This is what I am currently doing, and it pays well. I can charge between $50-$250 an hour as a Private Chef in different areas in Silicon Valley. I can charge that much because I provide the full experience, as well as paying for my own insurance, vehicle, equipment etc. I also get to do a lot of tax write-offs every year for my business related expenses. The only downside is lack of work, or getting too many opportunities. Also, there is always someone else trying to cut in on the price of a talented well sought after Chef.

And lastly your State/County Programs- These work with State and local governments as Cooks/Supervisors, and get paid well with good state or county benefits. The food however is more mundane and subsidized. Not a lot of creativity goes into these programs, just cost effectiveness.

One thing you have to understand, when you become a Chef, you'll do less time cooking and more time managing the kitchen and all of its business.
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