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Would having a class specific in teaching how to find and utilize resources to benefit the discovery of your career interests be benefitical for college students?

At some point in our lives, we become lost and uncertain about what to do with the rest of our life. Many of us go to college not knowing what we want to major in or what we want to do after we graduate. So, a class that helps students learn more about themselves in a way where it brings out the student's interests and passions, could be useful. Even if the students decide later in their life that they do not have the same interests as they use to, just having the resources they learned from the class can still be adaptive to any changes in a person life and is only there to help them get to where they want to be. #undecided #college-major #career

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Frank’s Answer

Hello Eboni,

I think what you are talking about is a great idea to offer students who might be undecided into what they want to do after school or even those who might be unsure about what they might have already decided. To your point, one of my college professors for one of my mandated classes for my degree, I was able to sit and talk with him about his experiences in the field I was interested in and he asked me why I wanted to go into that field. After I told him my reasons, he understood why I would want to go into the field since I had a great interest in it and had some good experience in the field as well but he was able to tell me things that I did not think about or overlooked in my expectations for the career choice and I was able to pivot to another major before going down a path I would not have been happy with. A class where you can have students listen to experienced individuals in different fields plus teaching them how to utilize different resources like research or aptitude test that can help them determine at all stages of life what could benefit them.
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De'andra’s Answer

This is brilliant Eboni! Marcus Buckingham has a new book coming out (Love + Work) that talks about just this...finding what you love, at work. It makes the day fly by, and generally gives you a lighter spirit when you love )at least most of) what you do. I recall switching majors in college and I had to proactively seek out an advisor to give me career inventory. Today there is so much more available at our fingertips. Sifting through it all is the hard part. Offering a course that walks students through the pros and cons of skills and personal assessments like Myers-Briggs, StandOut, or DISC out there would be highly beneficial.
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Natalie’s Answer

Hey Eboni,

I absolutely agree! After I graduated high school I had no idea what I wanted to do and ended up taking general studies at community college to start out. It's so overwhelming trying to decide what you want to major in when you're only just out of high school. I wish there had been a class like that where students could figure out which careers aligned best with their interests, and how to plan for your future. I think it would be so helpful.
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Courtney’s Answer

Hi Eboni,

You are spot on. We are trained to pick careers related to our passions. What they don't teach us is that our passions & interests are everchanging. Mentorship is highly important for self discovery and career path selection. Students need to be provided early with career exploration tools and resources to pivot.
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