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What are the requirements for MIT?

I'm trying to get into MIT and wondering what the requirements are. #college #MIT

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Amber’s Answer

While having good grades and extracurriculars are helpful when applying to MIT, note that there are people who theoretically "check all the boxes" but are not accepted. I recommend (on top of good stats and leadership/volunteering positions as Raquel mentioned) to do things that you are passionate about and curate your application to be distinctly yourself, telling a cohesive story of who you are as a person, what you care about and why, and why MIT is the best fit school for you, making yourself stand out from a pool of applicants.
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Raquel’s Answer

The best place to get information on what the school's admission requirements are would be their website and their admissions councilors. In general though, MIT takes applicants within the 75th percentile for SAT/ACT scores which would be 1570 on the SAT and 36 on the ACT. They also require two letters of recommendation: one from a math/science teacher and one from a humanities/social science/language teacher. As a part of the application you will need to submit your transcripts (again this is a competitive school, you need competitive grades), answer essay questions, and fill out information on activities you partake in. Schools like MIT look for volunteer and leadership experience. You can also submit a creative portfolio if it fits within your field of study and will benefit your application.
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Chris’s Answer

Amber and Raquel both provide great advice. I will add that it seems everything at MIT is conveyed through the language of mathematics. The required introductory calculus series (18.01 and 18.02) proceeds at twice the pace of such courses at other schools. For example, it is common for "Calculus I" to be basically just a course in differential calculus and "Calculus II" integral calculus. However, 18.01 covers all of differential and integral calculus. The series continues with multivariable calculus, gradients, field theory and other stuff that I can't remember in 18.02 that would normally be the subject of advanced calculus courses at other colleges. It seems like all other courses then use mathematical concepts to analyze problems -- I recall a professor using a summation operator to explain utilitarianism in a political philosophy class! All economics courses at MIT use calculus and higher-order math, where other schools might not use this kind of math outside of graduate-level courses (I know this from experience since I transferred to MIT and had to retake my intermediate economic courses at MIT because they would only give me credit for principles courses). So... whatever your SAT scores and grades are, be prepared to think in higher-order mathematics most of the time if you go to MIT. All that said, as hard as it was, I loved MIT and had the best time getting that degree.
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