Skip to main content
7 answers
7
Updated 850 views

I'm interested in becoming a telecommunications engineering specialist.

#1: Would this career path be a good choice for someone who is Realistic, Artistic, and Enterprising (Holland Code Theory)?

#2: How much education is needed to become a telecommunications engineering specialist?

#3: What does a telecommunications engineering specialist do on a day-to-day basis?

+25 Karma if successful
From: You
To: Friend
Subject: Career question for you

7

7 answers


2
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

John’s Answer

Erik, a Network Architect for a major line of business in our company, had the following answers to your questions:

#1: Would this career path be a good choice for someone who is Realistic, Artistic, and Enterprising (Holland Code Theory)?
This career path is a great choice for each of the Holland/RIASEC personalities as it requires such diverse thinking to truly make a difference.
For the Realistic characteristic, they fit perfectly into mission critical problem solving activities and speed to market initiatives.
For the Investigative characteristic, they first perfectly into analytics, understanding the big picture, and providing solutions for trends and insights.
For the Artistic characteristic, the field is perfect for ideation and the 'Art of the Possible' type of thinking that brings about transformational changes.
For the Social characteristic, the field definitely requires them. This field is all about communication and how we can network people and processes together. Creating solutions that relate on a personal level and exceed human and societal expectations is key. For Verizon, it's in our Credo.
We focus outward on the customer, not inward
We know teamwork enables us to serve our customers better and faster
For the Enterprising characteristic, being able to predict future needs as well as the ability to relate and communicate data and systems to set directions for strategic items forms the basis for long term planning and projects.
For the Conventional characteristic, an absolute perfect fit. Engineering at its core depends on structure and guidelines to be precise and dependable.
#2: How much education is needed to become a telecommunications engineering specialist?
I don’t think there is a single answer to this question any more. A degree certainly helps with entering or transitioning into this field, and to help ensure that a person is up to date on current technology.
But where this question many years ago would likely have been answered with a response such as a Bachelor of Science or Master of Science degree is required, I don’t think that is the case any longer. With the proliferation of training now available online, accessible technical certifications, access to open-source software, and low-cost cloud compute and storage resources, the ability to become skilled and experienced is so much broader.
#3: What does a telecommunications engineering specialist do on a day-to-day basis?
The field is so expansive that the day-to-day activities frequently change in some way every day.
Areas of specialty for example may have a person in the field testing or deploying network equipment, in a lab environment testing and experimenting with devices, or in a system environment building out the applications and systems of the future.
2
1
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

John’s Answer

#1: Would this career path be a good choice for someone who is Realistic, Artistic, and Enterprising (Holland Code Theory)?
The real question is whether this career path would be good for you! There are several things one can do to determine if the career field is for them. Learn as much as you can about it. Talking with those in the career field, or watching Youtube videos on the career path, and videos in which the career specialists talk about their trade, can help provide a better idea on whether it’s a good fit. If you can, ask a telecommunications engineering specialist if you can shadow them for a day or longer to see what they do. Glassdoor.com has a section called “Telecommunications Engineer Overview” (and other overviews for other career fields) that provides a description of what a Telecommunications Engineer does, how much they make in your city, the typical career path, and what Telecommunications Engineers say about (both good and bad) about their job experiences in the career field.

#2: How much education is needed to become a telecommunications engineering specialist?
My coworker Dale is a Network Engineer who is highly respected in our company. Dale says undergraduate degrees such as Computer IT, Computer Science, and Electrical Engineering are typical. Also, CISCO certifications like CCNA or CCIE can help one qualify for the job.
The website glassdoor.com: says the following are typical qualifications for Telecommunications Engineer jobs:
Bachelor's or Graduate's Degree in electrical or communications engineering or equivalent experience.
Prior experience in a consulting position.
Prior experience with SIP, CAD, GCAIH, CASP, AV, and CISA software and systems.
Prior experience with FPGA, CCMP, SIP, and GIS software and systems.
Fluent in communication systems, writing protocols, interfacing, computing, and cloud processes..
Collaboration with team to produce cost estimates.

#3: What does a telecommunications engineering specialist do on a day-to-day basis?
From glassdoor.com:
“Telecommunications engineers design and install the equipment used in transmitting wired phone, cellular, cable, and broadband data. They work with copper or Fiber Optic cables and complex networks as well as switching systems and may be employed by wired and wireless telecommunications companies, engineering consulting firms, or government agencies. They design or configure communications systems, including voice, video, and data, and install or coordinate installation for new or modified hardware, software, or programming modules of a telecommunications system.
Telecommunications engineers evaluate hardware and software to determine its efficiency, reliability, and compatibility with the existing systems, networks, and data. They monitor and analyze system performance to proactively identify service-impacting issues, manage large products requiring telecommunication services, and ensure timely planning and implementation. They produce, update, and generally improve technical documentation to support the systems’ security requirements and operational support. Telecommunications engineers need a bachelor's degree in electrical engineering, computer science, systems engineering, or related fields.
What responsibilities are common for Telecommunications Engineer jobs?
Maintain smooth operation of local area, world wide and virtual private networks (VPN).
Assist with the coordination of team members on complex projects.
Interpret codes, standards, requirements, and guidelines to complete assigned projects.
May provide support for moderate services and other products.
Support new product development and work on signal processing.
Prepare or ensure that appropriate network documentation exists, including operational instructions.
Provide guidance and expertise on department design guide, standards, systems, applicable engineering codes and company policies.
Communicate with management and provide work status updates daily.
Estimates, cost studies, customer contacts, negotiate land acquisitions for easements and access agreements.
Responsible for specific job budget development and tracking and for periodic job inspections and QC.
May propose solutions to management to ensure all communications requirements based on future needs and current usage, configuring such solutions to optimize cost savings.
Develop and maintain a strong relationship with the customers in order to work directly with them on complex projects.
Lifting of up to 20 pounds less than one-third of the time.
Seasoned in interfacing with network service providers and equipment vendors to ensure timely deployment of private and public services, with the ability to drive the resolution of problems when they occur.
Develop strategies and direction for new multimedia contact center systems and roadmaps for system improvements.
Provide oversight over contractor engineering firms and assist with the training of new employees and contractors.
Manage/coordinate permits for poles, third party make ready, Railroad, DOT, DOH and Municipality permits.
Setup and operate legacy headend equipment including but not limited to signal processors, modulators, demodulators, IRD's and IRT's.
Responsible to analog and digital channel level measurement and quality testing along with periodically testing of equipment and quality of signal throughout the network.
Expertise to differentiate between different sizes and colors of wires and to make cable connections in tight spaces by bending, reaching, twisting as well as work with small components and wires to make cable connections.
Proficiency to walk over various terrains in all kinds of weather while carrying tools and equipment, including ladders and fully loaded tool belts.
Plan, evaluate, and coordinate installation and/or reconfiguration of hardware and software elements of data and/or voice communication network.
Provide regular monitoring and network analysis regarding short- and long-range planning for in-house systems.

John recommends the following next steps:

Learn more about Telecommunications Engineer careers on Youtube
Learn more about Telecommunications Engineer careers at https://www.glassdoor.com/Career/telecommunications-engineer-career_KO0,27.htm#:~:text=Telecommunications%20engineers%20evaluate%20hardware%20and,systems%2C%20networks%2C%20and%20data.
Learn more about Telecommunications Engineer from reading information on CISCO certifications like CCNA or CCIE (is it interesting to you?)
1
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Vicky’s Answer

Hi, I have worked at Equinix, the worlds digital interconnection company, where we have over 200 global datacenters. I have a degree in Computer Science and Business Admin, of which helped me get the job at EQIX due to my experience in working with network technology at companies such as Nortel, Netscape, Polycom, VeriSign and now Equinix. This telecommunications engineering specialist is definitely a field where there will ALWAYS be opptys as it is a growing field and will ALWAYS have job openings. I see other folks have done an excellent job answering this question. I have found that you can get trained for this position via an associates degree or even a bachelors degree. There are many levels of education that you can use to become an asset in this field. Good luck as this entire field of telecommunications is a growing field, with endless opptys!
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Shawna’s Answer

1.) Being an Eng III Specialist at Verizon I would say yes, having those qualities would be beneficial. You need to be able to think quickly and be creative. You will need to be able to be realistic with your work load and find ways to get things done.

2.) Having any level of certifications or degree and/or prior work experience. I do not have a degree. My experience came from 10 yrs in the military working in Satellite communication. There are several co workers who have IT or other communication degrees that transitioned from other none Eng departments who have no hands on experience. There are many paths someone can take to get into this field.

3.) My day to day involves monitoring the network, assessing issues, taking corrective actions to address issues (this could be me troubleshooting the issue or managing vendors who perform troubleshooting depending on the situation). Working on projects to integrate new equipment and technologies; managing vendors during installation, and hands on equipment installation, integration and testing. Performing preventative maintenance of equipment, buildings, and supervising PM's performed by vendors for equipment such as HVAC and generators. Maintain inventory, requesting replacement equipment, tracking shipments, returning parts. I also fly a drone to assess site issues and for documentation. There are many more tasks that come up depending on the day and you have to be flexible and organized. You may have your day planned out but when an emergency occurs you have to be ready to respond quickly.
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Michelle’s Answer

Hi Fernando!
I currently work at Verizon in the Network Field Engineering organization. I've been with the company for 10 years and have held roles in four different disciplines, all within the Network Field Engineering organization.

As others have stated, there are so many ways to be involved in telecom engineering.
There are those that:
- Monitor usage and engineer / design new solutions to support customers needs and future growth
- Obtain real estate approvals to move forward with building solutions. This includes negotiating lease terms, obtaining zoning approval from the jurisdiction (city/county) and obtaining environmental clearances for the build.
- Build the solution by either modifying the existing assets (changing radios, antennas and lines), or building new.
- Create the scripts to integrate the new asset and/or solution.
- Field integrate and optimize the asset.
- Monitor customer needs and usage of the existing network and optimize assets to improve KPIs.

To answer your direct questions:
1. YES. Since there is such a variety of roles within the industry, any and all personalities are needed to have diversity of thought to problem solve and create the best customer experience.
2. At a minimum, a bachelor's degree is required; although the specific field of study is not required. (I have a Visual Arts degree)
3. Again, depending on role, daily activities will vary. But hopefully the outline above gives you a glimpse into what roles would look like and oversee.

Good luck in your future pursuits!
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Amely’s Answer

Congratulation on finding your career path early on.

#1: Would this career path be a good choice for someone who is Realistic, Artistic, and Enterprising (Holland Code Theory)?
Yes, I believe it would be a good choice. Realistic (the do-ers), Artistic( the creator) and Enterprising( the persuader). Either way, most career will need part of those characteristics to build a successful career. Being employed, communication skill are very important, hence persuader is a good characteristic. Being able to give ideas and knowing what is feasible in a project is also vital.

#2: How much education is needed to become a telecommunications engineering specialist?
Of course, a Bachelor's degree would be the minimum.

#3: What does a telecommunications engineering specialist do on a day-to-day basis?
- Monitor and analyze system performance, such as network traffic, security, and capacity.
- Supervise maintenance of telecommunications equipment.
- Keep abreast of changes in industry practices and emerging telecommunications technology by reviewing current literature, talking with colleagues, participating in educational programs, attending meetings or workshops, or participating in professional organizations or conferences.
- Order or maintain inventory of telecommunications equipment for customer premises equipment (CPE), facilities, access networks, or backbone networks.
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Patrick’s Answer

Hi, I work at Verizon, those are great questions. There isn't a clear answer here at Verizon
1. An artistic, realistic and enterprising person could find many career paths here. I, personally, have great flexibility to explore innovative and interesting possibilities for new products and processes. In my organization individuals have college degrees in a multitude of disciplines besides engineering. Sharing the vision and collaborating to achieve common goals is highly valued.
2. For us a Bachelors degree would likely be required for a new high, however, many of our engineers were promoted from our associate workforce where work experience translates as well as a college degree.
3. Day to day activities vary greatly. In my current position I am working to deploy new products to our internal technicians as well as to our customers. On a given day I may work on creating training aids (documents and videos) to support a new product or process. I also spend time working on new innovations like building a low cost robot as a proof of concept (prototype) or conducting trials with external vendors to see if their products will work in our complex environment. Other engineering work groups could be system architects or facilities engineers that create the networks in our offices or outside in your neighborhood. We have engineers that support software development as we create our own internal applications. There are many types of engineers here a Verizon and not all require a specialized degree.

I wish you luck in your future endeavors and hope this helps a little bit.
0