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How did you choose your profession?

As a person looking to be a welder what starter tips could you provide

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To: Friend
Subject: Career question for you

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Mani’s Answer

Think of what you are more interested into from the time you started your high school it could be as simple as interested in playing games, passionate in Math or Science or what you see in society today that you feel is missing and what you can do that can help you feel motivated and also make a difference in the world.
E.g
Games > Game Building using programming tools > Software Engineer profession
Science > Research on disease and finding solutions to cure them > Scientist
Organizing Data > Data Analytics > Data Scientist
Sickness > Treating people & solving their health issues > Doctor
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Brea’s Answer

Hi! One of the best ways to pick your profession is by getting first hand feed back from someone in a field you are interested in .
If you aren’t sure what field that maybe , start by asking yourself “what could I see myself doing? ”
once you have your list do research on how long you’ll have to be in school , how many graduates actually secure jobs in that field , average annual income , what city do these certain professions thrive in and last how long does it take the average person in that field to retire ,
All these things are major factors in the longevity of a successful career . After you’ve done your research in person and online the process of elimination becomes easier. Good luck and follow your heart !
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Jaden’s Answer

Hey LaQuinn!

I'd like to first start off by saying, what a great question!

In many ways, I feel like my profession chose me. Art has been something that I have done since about second grade and even then I feel like I knew that I wanted to be doing it for the rest of my life.

As someone who actually had to participate in a welding project while attending college, I highly reccomend that if you do go to school for welding, to be sure that you talk classmates and professors in the field.

A lot of times, professors will have reccommendations about potential opportunities within your chosen career field. They might reccomend certain part-time jobs, internships, personal-projects that could help you gain more experience in more professional settings. Often times, this is a great way to network and get your foot in the door, while already doing what you love.

However, if this is something you would prefer to jump right into, I would reccomend looking up local workshops in your area. This will give you studio space to create projects while also allowing you to connect with the people who run it. In any of these cases, you might find yourself in a position where you can ask those around you if they know of any jobs that recquire a welder and are willing to train an entry level one.

At the end of the day, you can pretty much start anywhere. You can never go wrong with research, whether that be a simple google search or even by just asking a peer/teacher in passing! The opportunities are endless and its really just a matter of putting yourself out there and asking.

I hope you find your way into the welding profession with ease and remember that it is great to ask questions!
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Hollie’s Answer

I found my profession(s) early in life. I was always very creative and creative writing came naturally to me. I am also very physical and graceful, so dancing came very naturally. While I've had various careers aligned with writing/comms (Marketing, Training, Internal Communications) since I was a teen, I became a professional dancer in my early teens into my mid-30s. I was/am extremely passionate about both! Eventually I opted to focus on comms as a profession due to the 'regular' hours and paycheck (vs nights, weekends, auditioning, non-steady work/paycheck etc for dancing). I'm 25 years in the comms world now, and still take class and teach on the side occasionally.

My suggestion, find where your natural talents are and what you're passionate about. You very likely can find a profession to suit them.
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Cam’s Answer

Hi LaQuinn!

To add to what others have suggested, it's important to consider the kind of lifestyle you're interested in. Certain careers offer flexibility and allow you to work when you want while others require you to be in a physical location when you're on duty. For example, certain types of consultants create their own schedules, but bear the burden of client service and can end up working long hours, weekends, holidays etc. By contrast, nurses typically work shifts and when they're off they're "free" from work. As you explore professions, make sure to see if the day-to-day aligns with your values.
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