Skip to main content
7 answers
12
Asked 562 views

Is what you do meaningful to you?

I am 22 and looking forward to getting my welding certification up to G6. One day I want to go underwater as an underwater welder because it is one of the most lucrative trades on the market. Is there anybody here that can give me some advice on what to do after I complete my Jobcorps training? I don't know whether to go into the military as a Navy Diver or begin advanced training first and then move into. Is there a path to skip military service and move directly into the private sector i.e. offshore oil rigs or harbor maintenance?

+25 Karma if successful
From: You
To: Friend
Subject: Career question for you

12

7 answers


0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Richard J (Rich)’s Answer

Beside serving your Country - joining the military in the career you are interested in provides you an opportunity to gain experience in a controlled environment. The key will be, if you pursue the military option, is whether that opportunity to be a Navy Diver is available. Being a Navy Diver is one of the most challenging fields in the military and a long journey. But many before you have achieved that goal - so nothing says you cannot achieve it either. Then, no matter how long you stay in the military - you have the experience to carry on in the private sector and you will be more marketable

Now, if you have an opportunity or a path on the private sector - that would be a way to go - but it is all about finding a way into the business. And, I agree, it is not getting a career so dangerous for the money - it is about the passion and the willingness to put yourself in that situation to serve your country or others in the business world.

Seize whatever opportunity that will help you begin and grow within your passion.
Thank you comment icon Thanks for your encouragement! John
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Cindi’s Answer

John,
Words of wisdom I have always passed on to my kids: Find something you love and do it with all your heart. If you do this, you will never 'work' a day in your life (because you are doing something you are passionate about).

Underwater welding has many risks and not something that I would enter in solely for the sake of being lucrative, but also because it's something you are passionate about. Are you already certified in SCUBA? Do you enjoy it? Have you purchased or used welding equipment? Do you enjoy it?

God has gifted each of us with very unique giftings and talents. My advice would be to seek those things out to ensure your direction aligns with your talents and passions. Sometimes those closest to us can clearly see gifts, talents, and leanings that we are not even aware of.

Also, with the inherent risks associated with this field, I would seek out the most qualified training available. If you opt to go the Navy route, it seems you would not only have the reward of serving your country, but you may also gain excellent training without taking on as much debt as you might from the private sector.

My advice would be to enter into this decision prayerfully so you can move forward with wisdom and understanding. I've included some next steps that you may want to consider as you move forward.

All the very best to you in your future!

Cindi recommends the following next steps:

Identify all of the components (not just money) that are driving your leaning toward underwater welding.
Speak to trusted and close family, friends and mentors to get their input on what they see as your strengths, weaknesses, and passions.
Identify people that have served in this capacity and ask for their input to get better understanding of the training, the actual day-to-day of the profession, etc.
Once equipped with facts, make a list of the pros and cons (both long and short term) of being in this profession.
If not already certified, get SCUBA certified. If you have not done any welding, find someone locally that can let you work alongside them on a small project or get your own equipment and do some small projects. This will provide insight (on a small scale) if you will enjoy this type of work.
Thank you comment icon Thank you, Cindi for the advice. John
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Tommy’s Answer

I think there is something incredibly valuable about doing work that you can find meaning in. I also believe that not every job or role you have throughout your time working - has to be in service of your ultimate purpose. There are some jobs that can serve as a springboard to something you're really passionate about. I personally have worked in fields where I cared deeply about the work, but doing the work every day removed some of the luster. As long as you continue to work towards finding a way to fulfill yourself outside of your job, you can find meaning in any work you do. Hope this helps!
Thank you comment icon I appreciate you taking the time to answer this. John
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Bob’s Answer

Well done John, great that you are qualifying with a great skill - one that will be needed for a very long time.

The military track is a good one - however you may be pushed into another career based on their needs - so benefits and drawbacks.

I was in Oil & Gas for many years and welders were always on site - either building sites, doing modifications or repair and maintenance. Most oil companies especially the big ones do not employ them directly - they are employed by the big contractors, the specialists.

Look at companies like KBR, Black and Veach and the big engineering firms - and work applications aggressively with them - be persistent and you will get picked - now to force it you may need to move those areas where the oil and gas is, where it's the main trade.

The sub-sea work is great - try Oceaneering, Woodmac, and other specialty companies.

The other part is the same industry is the pipeline business - both on and offshore - look at Bechtel.

One thing to note is that with time all companies will look to do the work with robots - especially for deep sea work - this to be more efficient and reduce safety and other risks - but then you could get into that industry as a robot controller - all they are is an extension of you.

Food luck - do for it!
Thank you comment icon Your advice was so helpful! John
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Shirley’s Answer

Research is your best friend and with that comes knowledge and contentment. Knowledge is power. It is the best tool in your toolbox.
You would be surprised how many people love to share their skills with someone who wants to learn.
There are several avenues for you to investigate...
Reach out to your local community. Go to your local Schools and volunteer to assist a teacher, and get sponsored into an internship for welders.
Go the the recruiting office and interview someone,(not the recruiter) in the military about your choices. By getting information from people who live the career everyday. Understand the challenges and the rewards. Try to get permission to "buddy" with an experienced diver(Get your certification first)
Determine which field of underwater welding you may want to go into.
Follow your heart. Let your instincts and your desire drive you!

Good Luck! Shirley
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Eileen’s Answer

Welding is an excellent trade and in high demand. Go for it! There are times where what I was doing was meaningful to me =- and times where it was not - the former is totally better than the latter, but one needs to be prepared and deal with those times that are not meaningful.
Thank you comment icon I am really grateful you took the time to answer this question. John
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Munleen’s Answer

Absolutely John! What you do SHOULD be PURPOSEFUL and thus meaningful to you and others! That is my personal coaching lesson to clients - but what that may look like changes over time - which is a beneficial thing. Why? Take welding for example - you're talking about a very laborious, consumptive action that from my limited experience working on welders is that they can only sustain such a risky job for a short duration.

At some point - I would ask yourself why it is you want to be a welder? Is it just for money? - I speak from experience in that I chose to walk away from a "lucrative" career to pursue my passion which has also taken a toll but my heart is still intact!

It also seems like you might want to find a person you trust to help you decipher through your "confusion" (do NOT mean that in a derogatory way!) quite the opposite - it's a good thing to have foresight, such as you're doing welding for money - but is that truly why? To join the military doesn't require tuition (at least not in my time!) - in fact you also get compensated; likewise it appears as though you're then fast-forwarding into working within the private sector, like a contractor?

First off - as much as as we are socialized by the anxious forces around us to go go go and somehow just know what that trajectory will be - here's the actuality - there is only but the present and unknown. Seriously! It's been a real challenge to hear - but! I will say it does pay off if you do it the optimal way - which is to learn how to develop a skillfull mind in those moments where it appears you are not doing anything.. - if you need a better explanation please do not hesitate to ask me! Likewise if you feel comfortable working through a gameplan with me I am here to serve!

In short - 1) Recommend using this to help develop your inner voice "intuition" to help you discern when it's time to ditch a situation.
2) Research! - Start by asking around - and don't rely on friends literally around you - go to forums. challenge yourself to seek answers to questions about the difference between military vs private employment etc
3) Lastly - did you take the ASVAB? That would also help determine if you're in fact going only to the Navy...

I hope this helped! If it didn't please let me know how I may improve.
Thank you comment icon Your advice was so helpful! John
0