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what is a day like for Lawyers ?

i have been thinking about this as a career.

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Jennifer’s Answer

There are a few factors that will generally dictate an "average" day. The biggest factor is who is your client, which can be a law firm that has many different clients, it can be a company, it can be local, state or federal government, or some other entity such as a non-profit. Another factor is the specific type of law that you practice. Litigators tend to be the most tied to deadlines, which are dictated by the local rules of civil procedure (e.g., once a complaint is filed in court by the plaintiff - the party making a claim and suing another party - the rules require the defendant - the party being sued - to respond in 30, 45, 60 , etc. days; thereafter, there are time deadlines for motions, responses, etc.). Other lawyers are tied to deadlines set by clients that are most times arbitrary but sometimes tied to a business deal (e.g., one company is buying another company, which is generally referred to as mergers and acquisitions, and both parties want the closing done by the end of the year (usually for tax reasons) so they set a schedule).

What you should really be considering, in my opinion, is how good are you at prioritizing and organizing. Clients, no matter who they are, tend to believe they are your only client (even in a company there are many managers, executives, employees who all need/want help/information from you) and expect that you are able to serve them on their timetable. So, you need to be able to recognize what matters are most time-sensitive and critical that demand your full attention now and what matters you are able to put off for another time.

Years of experience build this library of knowledge and management. At the outset of your career, senior lawyers you work with will/should help you to build this type of knowledge.

Best of luck!
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Autumn’s Answer

Hi, Ju'Lyon! A day in the life of a lawyer can vary based on a few things, namely the type of law practiced. I'm an attorney for a large company (typically referred to as In-House Counsel). My day is typically includes a variation of the main components of my job: negotiating contracts with customers via email and phone, researching laws to provide advice to internal teams, drafting or revising drafts based on what's best for the company. Sometimesz it's very busy at times but also can slow down, especially around the holidays. There can also be special projects that pop up. I'm sure this day differs from those of other attorneys since there are so many different ways to practice law. If you decide to go to law school, try to use that time to explore the subjects and matters that interest you. That will help you figure out the type of law that is the best match for you once you graduate. Best of luck to you!
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Dan’s Answer

Hi Ju'lyon,

You've received some good answers above. Let me add to the mix. What's typical often depends on the type of law practice you may decide to go into. I work as an "in house" lawyer -- that means I'm employed by a corporation and have only one client. It suits me because I have enjoyed learning all about that corporation's business and serving one client, as opposed to many. I'm typically spending half of my day in meetings and videoconferences with other lawyers and business people and the other half reading and responding to client inquiries (lots of email!).

Lawyers who have other law practices could have a very different "typical" day. I have friends who are trial lawyers and judges -- they spend most of their days in the courtroom, much like you've probably seen on t.v. That is a small slice of lawyers overall. The vast majority spend much of their time as I do -- lots of meetings, lots of reading, and lots of writing! Good luck in your career.
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