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How can I start in welding and when?

I was in a course of welding in highschool last year I learned some welding but not too much

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Jen’s Answer

See if your school has a welding instructor you can speak to to learn more about expanding your exposure to welding. Each state has welding education schools as well that you can pursue. It might also be worth your time to speak to a welder and get feedback about what is great and what is challenging about the career. Good luck!
Thank you comment icon Thank you, Jen! Jose
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Timothy’s Answer

If you can talk to someone in the industry, that is a great place to start because you can hear some insights from someone firsthand. If there is a vocational school near you, check into that. They usually have good welding programs. Or check into your local community college. They usually have really good programs. I would use some caution if you are thinking of a trade school. A lot of those will teach you the very basics at best but will not teach you actual real life useful skills and techniques. You also won’t get any certifications. They say that they offer job placement assistance but you will essentially go in at a ground floor entry level with no skill so they pay will be low and getting the attention and direction you need might be tough so it will be hard to advance. Like i said vocation or community college and make sure that they have modules that simulate real world situations. Also make sure you will be leaving with welding certifications. And do research on your own. Talk to people in the industry as much as you can. I love what I do. I really truly do. I have been welding/fabricating for 28 years. I take a lot of pride in my craft and I put in the time and effort to be the best at what I do. You will get to see a lot of cool places and build some really interesting and challenging things as well. I really hope this helps. Good luck Jose and maybe we will be burning metal elbow to elbow one day!!!
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Neal’s Answer

You can join a Union (Ironworkers or Steamfitters) and depending on the job market with this Infrastructure Bill, earn and learn in their apprentice program. If you'd rather weld for artist endeavors, just get a welding machine and maybe find some vids online and start practicing. It's tricky at first but you need steady hand and patience. Always keep the rod moving in a linear direction, lighly dragging it across the surface, while 'drawing' little circles, which would technically create a squiggle/spiral movement and 'stay in the puddle'. If you get an Arc welder, and use 1/8 rods, put your heat on 120. If you get a Mig welder, that's more 'point and click' and you don't have to move as much. I have a small 110 (voltage ~ that you can plug into a regular outlet) wire feed machine. Have Fun!
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Jacob’s Answer

Starting a career in welding is a promising choice, especially if you have some prior experience from your high school course. Here are steps to help you begin your welding journey:

1. **Assess Your Interest:** First, ensure that welding is something you're genuinely interested in pursuing as a career. It can be physically demanding and requires attention to detail.

2. **Research the Field:** Learn about the various types of welding, such as MIG, TIG, stick, and more. Understand the differences and applications for each.

3. **Get Educated:** Consider enrolling in a formal welding program at a trade school or community college. These programs provide structured instruction and hands-on practice. Many offer certifications that can enhance your job prospects.

4. **Apprenticeships:** Look for welding apprenticeship programs in your area. These offer a combination of on-the-job training and classroom instruction, providing practical experience and skills development.

5. **Acquire Safety Knowledge:** Safety is paramount in welding. Familiarize yourself with safety procedures, including the use of protective gear, proper ventilation, and safe welding practices.

6. **Practice Regularly:** Like any skill, welding requires practice to improve. If you have access to welding equipment, practice your skills regularly to build confidence and proficiency.

7. **Invest in Tools:** Consider investing in your welding tools and equipment as you progress. Having your equipment can be beneficial, especially if you plan to work independently or as a freelance welder.

8. **Networking:** Connect with professionals in the welding industry. Attend local welding trade shows, join welding forums, and consider joining professional organizations like the American Welding Society (AWS).

9. **Certifications:** Depending on your career goals, pursue relevant welding certifications. These can increase your employability and earning potential.

10. **Job Search:** Begin your job search when you feel confident in your welding skills. Entry-level positions such as welding assistants or apprentices can be a good starting point.

11. **Stay Informed:** The welding field evolves with technology and industry trends. Stay updated by reading industry publications and attending continuing education courses.

12. **Consider Specialization:** Welding offers numerous specialization opportunities, such as underwater welding, aerospace welding, or pipeline welding. Explore these options as your career progresses.

13. **Soft Skills:** In addition to technical skills, develop soft skills like communication, problem-solving, and teamwork. These skills are valuable in any career, including welding.

As for when to start, you can begin your welding education and training at any time. Many welding programs accept students with a high school diploma or GED. If you already have some experience from your high school course, that's a good foundation to build upon. The key is to set clear goals, acquire the necessary skills and knowledge, and continuously improve your craft. Welding offers a range of career opportunities, from construction to manufacturing, and with dedication, you can find a path that suits your interests and ambitions in the field.
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Michael’s Answer

There's a wide range of choices available, but one excellent choice would be to enroll in an apprenticeship program. Options include Union Ironworkers, Boilermakers, Plumbers and Steamfitters, or Sheetmetal workers, among others. Your choice would depend on your personal interests.
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