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Is it worth it going to college to get your masters degree for medical?

One of the career choices I'm debating on requires a master's degree, and I know that getting a master's degree will not be easy and expensive.

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Subject: Career question for you

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Karin’s Answer

Hi Lydia,

Only you can decide if it is worth it FOR YOU. How badly do you want to be a nurse midwife?

If you really want it, you should be eager to get the appropriate level of education and experience. Becoming a nurse midwife requires a graduate level degree. You'll have a lot of responsibility as a nurse midwife and will have to make split- second decisions while someone's life is on the line. A mother can bleed out in minutes. A baby can suffocate within minutes during birth.

A graduate program requires that you earn a bachelors first. After your bachelors you can "just" be a nurse though if you don't want to continue in school. Or you can take a break and work for a couple of years before you tackle the masters.

I hope ths helps!

KP
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Shanesha’s Answer

Hello Lydia!

This is a great question. I appreciate you for taking the time out to inquire. There isn't a simple answer to this question.
A Master's degree will not be easy but it can be worth it. It does not always have to be expensive. You would want to weigh your options between the two career paths and see which makes the most sense for you.
One way to avoid paying for a Master's degree would be working at a company that offers tuition reimbursement. Many jobs will work with you when it comes to helping you obtain a post graduate degree.
Try looking at companies that offer both of the career paths you are interested in. Many jobs offer programs, loans, grants and other things to help you get a better education. Don't let expenses stop you from achieving any goal you have.
Trust me, you can graduate with a Masters debt free.

Shanesha recommends the following next steps:

https://www.investopedia.com/financial-edge/0611/7-ways-to-get-through-grad-school-debt-free.aspx
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Patrick’s Answer

Lydia, I want to first thank you for reaching out and asking your questions regarding whether you should seek a master’s degree or not. Lydia your consideration of pursuing a master's degree in the medical field is a significant decision, and it's commendable that you are weighing the pros and cons thoughtfully. I hope the information that I have below provides you some insight and/or help.

Firstly, it's important to understand that obtaining a master's degree in a medical profession can indeed broaden your career horizons, allowing you to concentrate on a specific area and often leading to roles with greater responsibilities and leadership opportunities. While it's true that earning a master's degree can be demanding and requires a financial commitment, it's vital for you to assess the potential advantages in relation to your long-term career objectives. A master's degree can boost your proficiency, possibly leading to a more rewarding and influential career in healthcare.

Furthermore, it could lead to a higher earning potential over the course of your career. Lydia, it's crucial that you thoroughly research the specific prerequisites and career paths related to your chosen field, consider the potential return on investment, and look into financial aid options, such as scholarships or grants.

Lydia, always remember that the choice to pursue a master's degree should be in line with your professional goals. I urge you to seek advice from mentors, professionals in your intended field, and academic advisors to make a well-informed and confident decision about your educational path in the medical profession.
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Martha’s Answer

Hi, Lydia - I also commend you for thinking through your potential career choices so thoroughly. And Shanesha has given you excellent advice. I just want to add a few points:
- Hospitals have special programs for funding nursing education since there has been a nursing shortage for quite a while. So look at those programs when considering jobs
- Some masters programs will give academic credit for work experience, which would shorten the time to degree and potentially tuition
- Looking at nursing again, there are several professional levels so you could earn a credential, gain some experience, and then seek further education to progress to the next level. Or, based on what else is happening in your life, you may want to stay at a specific level, and that is great, too.
- I completed my master's degree (not in healthcare) while working full-time and agree that it was challenging. Everyone is different, but I did fine completing the coursework. My struggle was completing the thesis because it was so solitary. If I had it to do again, I might find a buddy to study, research, or write with for the motivation and accountability.
Good luck!

Martha recommends the following next steps:

Read article on funding nursing education -https://post.edu/blog/how-to-pay-for-nursing-school/
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