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Where do I look for opportunities for future marine biologists?

I want to be one and my networking skills need some work. #marine-biology #networking


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Alyssa’s Answer

Look for public events at aquariums or zoos, and talk with the speakers or other professionals who attend! Often times, this is a great way to meet people in the field. Also look for volunteer opportunities related to your field of interest. Good luck!


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Michael’s Answer

I would definitely join Earthtrust. Earthtrust (ET) is a non-governmental environmental organization based on the island of Oahu in Hawaii. Earthtrust was founded by in 1976 by Don White, a founding member and former international campaign director of Greenpeace International who has directed the organization since its inception. Earthtrust is responsible for the largest conservation victory in history by biomass due to its critical role in exposing, documenting, and ending large-scale high seas driftnetting. Earthtrust succeeded in getting the first ever documentation of actively fishing driftnet vessels of a huge 3-nation fleet- at that time unknown to the world at large. It then produced the video “Stripmining the Seas” and used it, along with Earthtrust's briefing document of worldwide driftnet impacts, to catalyze a fast-growing movement among fishing nations, and secondarily among conservationists. It Attacked Japan's Fisheries Organization for its mistreatment of whale and tuna fishing and took their case to the United Nations and won.

Michael recommends the following next steps:

Contact Earthtrust in Hawaii they are always looking for marine biologists
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The pay may not be much but it will be the excitment of your life & it will make you feel so good.
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Morgan’s Answer

Are you already pursuing your undergraduate degree? If so, I'd recommend not specializing in order to keep your options open. If possible, I'd minor in computer science or math or some kind of big data/data analytics. Many marine biology jobs are temporary or seasonal and don't offer a lot of stability. If you're up for adventure, enjoy some of these seasonal field jobs and see parts of the world you may not get to otherwise. After that, you'll have enough experience in your chosen field and can use your minor to advance when you are ready for stability.
Texas A&M has a great job board with paying and volunteer jobs. Stop dodo has a lot of volunteer jobs around the world that will pay you a stipend or your housing.
Fisheries observer or protected species observer work is also a good option and only requires a B.S. and often opens the door to other work with state and government agencies.

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Carlos’s Answer

Hello, I am from Ecuador, and I can advice you on what some friends did, they volunteered on Galapagos Islands, and they got a lot of experience and also got contacts from the foundation. So for theirs, it is easier than for the rest of us, to go to Galapagos again and get a job there, because they have the previous experience working there.

So maybe, you can start volunteering on any marine reserve, and then return to see if they can give you a job.

Another way that I can advice, is to become friend of any teacher of your university related to the marine biology, and then start to help in any project of they, and then it also helps you getting experience that later, any work will request you.

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Priscilla’s Answer

Hello! You're in luck! Oregon State University in Corvalis (where you live) has everything you want. Oregon Sea Grant hosts several summer day camps at Oregon State for kids 8 to 18. These camps focus on themes, such as marine technology, marine mammals, and more. As a camper, you'll interact with researchers and learn even more on field trips. You can even ask your camp counselors about a career in marine biology, and all the different things you can do as a marine biologist. You can also make friends with other students interested in marine biology.

Priscilla recommends the following next steps:

You can go online and check out the camps, as registration starts soon for summer 2021. They have a list of camps in your area. The web site is: oregoncoaststem.oregonstate.edu
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Students who live in other areas should check out their local summer camps in marine biology, biology, or STEM.
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Tiara’s Answer

Texas A&M Galveston and Texas A&M Corpus Christi have some of the best programs and internships for marine biology. You should definitely check it out if you can

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Gary’s Answer

While getting a Masters degree is valuable, it is possible to get into the field with a BS. Many agencies employ biologists, these include Federal agencies, Tribes, states, counties, and cities. There are also many consulting companies. You sometimes have to dig through their personnel systems, because their classification systems do not reflect biologist. I had a friend that did biology work for a county and his classification was Engineer. Many universities and professional societies have job listings (e.g Univ. of WA, College of the Environment, American Fisheries Society). Starting out you may be in temporary positions. Experience is important, so look for opportunities.

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Jill’s Answer

Attend conferences and give a poster or presentation so that you can meet people interested in your work. A lot of conferences have student poster competitions and this is something that looks good on a resume. Science outreach opportunities are another way to network, even if it's not your specific field of interest. Knowing how to communicate your science opens a lot of doors. Good luck.

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Marco’s Answer

Find a university with a Marine Biologist program, preferably somewhere you are willing to move to. Look at their admission requirements and work towards fulfilling them. Hope this helps.


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Glenn’s Answer

Hi Amanda, If you're in Corvallis, Oregon, check out the Hatfield Marine Science Center (HMSC) marine laboratory located in Newport, Oregon. https://hmsc.oregonstate.edu/ Certainly go to Newport and check it out...But even before you do that, in the meantime, figure out where on the OSU campus people that study there at the HMSC (graduate and undergraduates, proffessors) are tied to --what is their "home department" at the main OSU campus in Corvallis. Look for talks given by graduate students and other engagement opportunities with the community that are both attending/involved with OSU's main campus and going out to HMSC as well--I'm sure you will find some great opportunities. Attend a thesis defense or two! And then of course, look for volunteer opportunities when you're old enough to do those, or get a parent to come. Beyond that...you could join the University of Victoria's Marine Mammal list serv (email group) if you're interested in "MARMAM" taxa--kind of a look under the hood at a cross-section of what different marine mammal biologists are up to--including occasional job and internship opportunities. https://lists.uvic.ca/mailman/listinfo/marmam . Also look in to list servs or facebook groups that the marine biology students may be following at OSU. Marine Biology is a vast field! Feel free to check out a series my friend Seabird McKean put together when the pandemic hit so that people could learn, it's at a college level but trying to be accessible to all: Marine Biology at Home https://youtu.be/SzZqmxuEvYo and the facebook community here https://www.facebook.com/marinebioathome/ Good luck!

Glenn recommends the following next steps:

check out the Hatfield Marine Science Center (HMSC) marine laboratory located in Newport, Oregon. https://hmsc.oregonstate.edu/
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the HMSC is doing a virtual marine biology day on April 10, you may be able to gain some networking opportunities there https://events.oregonstate.edu/event/virtual_marine_science_day?utm_campaign=widget&utm_medium=widget&utm_source=Oregon+State+University#.YGbTea9KiM8
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Here is where OSU's marine biologists get their degrees (in the College of Science, School of Life Sciences, Integrative Biology Dept! https://catalog.oregonstate.edu/college-departments/science/school-life-sciences/integrative-biology/biology-bs-hbs/marine-biology-option/
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Marine Mammal List Serv https://lists.uvic.ca/mailman/listinfo/marmam
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Facebook Group where you can find introductions and links to the Marine Biology at Home you tube series : https://www.facebook.com/marinebioathome/
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Tobias’s Answer

PUT YOURSELF OUT THERE! great place to start is here. But, find events, schools, universities that do outreach and attend the events. Can also email people directly who are doing things you find interesting.; if they have the time they will respond, if not they won't so not harm done.

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Lindsey’s Answer

Biologists do not normally specialize until they reach graduate level studies. Begin at your local community college and/or university and earn your bachelors degree in biology. Keep your scores high as graduate programs are notoriously competitive to get into.
Marine biologists further specialize into their careers and I’m not sure what you want to study—you didn’t say freshwater or sea water or which particular animal you have an interest in. MBs are needed everywhere from state resource management departments (yes, even the state of Nebraska) to very remote islands on pearl farms and a myriad of roles in between. No matter where you live (yes, even Nebraska) there are aquariums, fisheries centers, state wildlife and conservation offices, and veterinarians who specialize in treating aquatic animals. Find a volunteer position and if any events are held, go and talk to the biologist giving the presentation. You will have a good reference and build your network, but do not let this come before your studies. You will have many people competing for a very limited number of graduate spots.
Be sure during your time as an undergrad, you study for the GRE and submit your application to your graduate school on time, every time. I am partial to the University of Texas A&M at Corpus Christi (have a good hurricane evacuation plan....just saying).

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