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Does it take a lot to work or college time to work for those big companies like Apple, microsoft, sony, or anything video game related.

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I hate college and think its a waste of time and money. Is there any i can work at these places without going to college. #gaming #videogamesmaking #videogames

I wouldn't say you can work for those big companies without going to college, but I would recommend learning code and aim for a smaller part in video games. You can learn coding on your own and still be able to survive in a career but I don't see any big companies. I wouldn't say if it is entirely true just more of a recommendation. Sebastian A.
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Kevin’s Answer

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It really depends on what sort of work you are planning to do. But for the most part large corporations and game studios in general will favor someone with a college degree over someone without one for one main reason: Getting the degree shows that you can commit to a long-term project and see it through. Getting a college degree requires commitment, time-management skills, communication skills, and many other "soft" skills. Some positions will require specific degrees, but remember, up until very recently there were no game development degrees. Everyone who entered the game industry had a degree in something else.

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Matt’s Answer

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All three companies you mentioned, plus more, will sometimes hire people without college degrees. It's the exception, though, in my experience. You don't say what part of making videos games that you want to work on -- is it programming, art, design, audio, something else?

One way to get into large companies without a degree is starting as a software tester (sometimes called a quality assurance tester.) I've know folks in QA that move up within an organization into design, art and production.

Have you been to college? How do you know you hate it? What do you hate about it?

I agree that some colleges and programs are definitely a waste of money. But not all are.

Have you considered non-traditional post-secondary education? Something self-directed? Maybe online courses with certificates from Coursera or other similar sites?
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