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I'm soon to graduate from high school and would like to take up Culinary and want to know how long are culinary classes and do they have any schools in the Bronx.?

'm soon to graduate from high school and would like to take up Culinary and want to know how long are culinary classes and do they have any schools in the Bronx.

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Matt’s Answer

If you can find an apprenticeship program with the ACF you get paid to train and end with a culinary certification that is well respected. Be willing to relocate and move anywhere in the beginning for experience and knowledge.
When you get further along in your career and are looking at jobs that pay more they will require a diploma or certification.
You can learn to cook from great chefs but as you get older you want to get paid. Opening a restaurant is a very risky business financially. Consider working your way up in hotels or corporations with a stable income and a 401k to put away for retirement at an early age.
Becoming an executive chef of a world renowned luxury brand is a well respected position.
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Brandie’s Answer

Culinary classes and programs can vary greatly in length depending on the type of education and qualification you are pursuing. Here's a general overview:

1. **Diploma/Certificate Programs**: These can range from a few months to about a year and provide basic training in culinary skills.

2. **Associate's Degree**: Typically a two-year program if attended full-time, an associate's degree offers a more comprehensive education, often including both practical kitchen skills and some academic courses related to the hospitality industry.

3. **Bachelor's Degree**: A four-year program that offers an in-depth study of the culinary arts, often with a broader scope including management, hospitality, and advanced cooking techniques.

4. **Apprenticeships**: These can vary in length but often last about two years and combine on-the-job training with some classroom instruction.

5. **Short Courses**: For those looking to learn specific skills or dishes, there are short courses that can last from a single session to several weeks.

As for culinary schools in the Bronx, New York, you may need to do some local research as the availability of culinary programs can change and new institutions may arise. However, here are a few options in and around the Bronx to consider:

- **Monroe College**: Located in the Bronx, Monroe College offers an Associate in Applied Science (A.A.S.) in Culinary Arts and a Bachelor of Business Administration (B.B.A.) in Hospitality Management which includes culinary coursework.

- **The Culinary Institute of America (CIA)**: While not in the Bronx, the CIA is one of the most prestigious culinary schools in the world and is located in Hyde Park, NY, which is about an hour and a half drive from the Bronx. They offer associate and bachelor's degree programs in culinary arts.

- **International Culinary Center (ICC)**: Previously located in Manhattan, ICC has been known for its intensive culinary programs. However, as of my knowledge cutoff in 2023, ICC has merged with the Institute of Culinary Education (ICE), which is also located in Manhattan and offers a variety of culinary programs.

- **City University of New York (CUNY)**: Some CUNY community colleges offer culinary arts programs or related fields in hospitality management.

When considering a culinary school, it's important to visit the campus if possible, talk to admissions counselors, and review the curriculum to ensure it aligns with your career goals. Additionally, consider the reputation of the school, the experience of the faculty, the facilities available, and the success of its graduates in the industry.
Thank you comment icon Thank you for the advice. Tyvay
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Paul’s Answer

I am not sure about the Bronx. Have never been there. But there is high quality of food venue in NY so I am reasonably sure there is. Now you will need to understand, this type of school is not high school. They are there to train you to become a professional chef, not to play hs games. You will be studying constantly and you will be judged on the food you create. You will make good they instruct you to make plus they will want you to be creative and produce something original. That takes time. It will be a few years but if you are passionate about your profession you will succeed.
Thank you comment icon Thank you so much! Tyvay
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Georgeann’s Answer

Brandie gave a pretty great reply. I am an adjunct culinary instructor at a culinary school in South Jersey (where I had graduated from) our program is two years.
It def is a great idea to tour the schools first to see what they offer. Many will let you sit in on a class as well.
If you do enroll, I always suggest to my students that you try to find even a part time job while in school for two reasons. One, to see the real everyday workings of a restaurants. The life is not like what you see on tv. And second, you will gain more real world skills that when combined with your culinary education, will put you in a better position when you graduate.
Thank you comment icon Thank You! Tyvay
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Richard’s Answer

I attended a culinary school in upstate NY, Paul Smith's.... I had worked a few years in the industry prior (while in high school) and, honestly, as Ross said, they didn't teach me anything in that first year that I hadn't learned or been exposed to in the industry (except for the microbiology classes, but for that you can just take an on-line Servsafe course). I did not complete my second year in school because I went to Colorado on spring break and ended up getting a job out there... This was the mid 1980's but it's still true today... walk in to a busy restaurant around 2pm on a thursday, find the Chef and tell him you want a job where you can learn and grow, I mentor my cooks... help them grow and it definitely benefits my operation. I know I've done my job when a 2 or 3 year cook comes to me and says he is leaving for a Sous job down the street.... You go to school for HRM (hotel, restaurant management) when you want to grow your career beyond retail restaurant operations, but some people just love the working chef's life and don't need a degree at all...

Richard recommends the following next steps:

Visit with chef's in your neighborhood (or hop a train and go to downtown manhattan if you'd be willing to make that commute) during their down time and express your interest....
Thank you comment icon Richard, thank you! Tyvay
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Ross’s Answer

I'm a little unorthodox so I will say this. Don't go to culinary school and waste your money. Get a job at a restaurant that is willing to train you. I train even experienced cooks how to improve their technique. Culinary school will teach you how to cut and onion and so will I, the difference is you will be paying the culinary school for something I will be paying you to learn. When you get out of culinary school you will be earning the same amount of money that someone with no skills will be earning so why waste your time and money in school when I will hire you, teach you, and pay you.
Thank you comment icon Thank you so much, Ross! Tyvay
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