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How should I go about writing an academic appeal?

My college GPA is unsatisfactory, and I'd like to get a second chance to earn my merit scholarship back.

+25 Karma if successful
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To: Friend
Subject: Career question for you

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Curtz W.’s Answer

It is honorable that you wish to seek amends with your college and fulfill your educational goals. I faced this tough challenge under the same circumstances you shared.
Please read carefully the instructions provided by your institution. I suggest you discuss them with your assigned college advisor and later meditate on what is required of you and your ability to fulfill the requirements. The purpose of the letter of appeal is to reveal that you have a healthy outlook, willingness, and skills to finish your journey. You want to show your conviction without exaggeration and unnecessary lack of confidence.
How you wish to proceed is your choice. I spent time preparing before writing the letter and followed the directions from A to Z. It may be advantageous to begin responding to your college counselors' recommendations before submitting the letter. For example, if you were advised to seek an official school tutor's aid, please do it. You may state in the letter the initiatives you engaged in up to that date.
In my case, I had to give evidence of my medical conditions and explain how these setbacks were being addressed to help me succeed academically. As you may detect from my situation, your letter likely entails some degree of your life adjustments and resolutions.
Like Ms. Turner, I accepted the probationary period. Please note: acceptance depends much on one's attitude towards compliance. Many sacrifices and hard work were involved during my probationary time to pull my grades upward. It was not blissful, and the struggles continued a few weeks before graduation. I was fighting hard against considerable difficulties outside the university that affected my performance. I hope it is better for you.
I recommend stating what's necessary in the letter and avoiding overdoing it with details. The people reading the letter are knowledgeable and experienced and would appreciate how well you respond to their request for information.
At this junction, you may examine your options to secure a robust and proficient future. People may thank the institution for allowing them to continue their education through a probationary period and decline their offer. They may find alternative avenues to enjoy success in their lives. The college (and you, too ) welcome knowing without question if this is your wish. May you have the best life ever - good fortune.
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Ashlee’s Answer

When faced with a similar situation in college, I wrote letter of appeal to the Dean of Students and focused the content of that letter on three areas:

1. Identifying the underlying cause of my unsatisfactory academic performance. I outlined a couple of things that I knew were direct contributors to my problems. This showed the Dean that I was taking responsibility for my actions, and not just making excuses.
2. I outlined the steps I put in place to ensure that I was in a position to continue my studies successfully, and perform at the level that was expected of me to regain my scholarship and academic standing.
3. I explained why regaining my scholarship and academic standing was important to me and the goals that I had for the future, and tied these reasons back to step 2 to try and show and explain that I was doing the work to achieve these goals, and not relying on taking the easy path or expecting someone else to "fix" my problems for me.

Once the Dean received and reviewed my letter, I was invited in for an interview where we had a more in depth conversation about the things that I had written out, and she appreciated the thought that I put into the letter and determined that the efforts I was taking to improve my academic standing regardless of my scholarship was proof that I was willing to make the changes needed to be successful.

While I did not receive my scholarship back immediately, I was given a probationary semester to prove that I could and would do what was required of me, and at the completion of that probationary period, I was able to regain my scholarship as long as my grades met the agreement established between myself and the Dean.

The biggest thing to remember, though, is not to get discouraged. We all go through difficult times, or are faced with challenges we didn't anticipate. If you are unable to get your scholarship back, you can also look into grants and other forms of financial aid to help offset the cost of completing your education. Best of luck to you!
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