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Do employers hire you based on what college you graduated from?

Hi, I am a sophomore and I just wanted to know does it matter to employers which college I get a degree from? would I have a better chance at getting a job if I went to a university rather than an online school? #college #jobs #employers #hire


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CareerVillage’s Answer

Yes, early in your career, employers certainly care about the reputation of your college or university. And this makes sense: they want to get the most talented people they can find, and they don't have a lot of information available to evaluate candidates. As a result, when they're looking at a stack of 250 resumes for 1 position, it can definitely make a difference to have a recognizable university on your resume. The other important factor is that full-time universities often have a "Career Services" department where employers sometimes go to find resumes of prospective employees, and where you can increase your chances of getting a job. These departments are not fool proof, but they are another major advantage over online schools. Online schools are not a bad option if you have no way to pay for school, and no scholarships or loans you can take out, but if you're going straight from high school and a full-time university is an option, it's almost always going to be better for your career to attend one.


Thank you! DejaCodman2 .

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NurseSandy’s Answer

Yes yes yes! When I have to hire someone for a junior position, I am always looking at their education first. There are three categories for me: a school I have heard of that I think is a high quality school with high quality students, a schol I have heard of which I think is not a very desirable school to attend, and then all of the schools I've never heard of. You definitely want to be in the first category if I read your resume in a resume screening.


Thank you! DejaCodman2 .

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AngelEd’s Answer

I've never, nor have any of the companies I've worked for, hired based on where a student comes from. That said, I've tossed out applications based on certain schools and past experiences with bad employees. Some schools have a really bad rap for not properly educating their students on the skills they'll need for working in the real world. Other schools have produced very entitled candidates who seemed to think they ran the place from day one (they got fired very quickly).


What's more important is how you sell yourself and your experiences. If I see someone who has consistently been working on a student group and rose to a leadership position, I'll get excited. I'll also get excited by a student who worked while in school (I like hungry people who don't rest on the laurels of completing required tasks).


If you can position your experiences well, it doesn't matter where you went. If you don't have the experiences, than a good school can help.


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Maya’s Answer

1. Going to a high ranking university, especially one known for whatever program or field of study you are getting a job in, certainly puts you in a better position. At the end of the day, employers want to know you are coming out of school with the expected base-line knowledge you need to then learn on the job, and going to a school with a known program is the best way for employers to be confident their new hires have a base-line knowledge and have taken the required courses. However, it is not required that you go to a high-ranking university to get a job.
2. People hire who they know. They like to hire out of the school they went to, so even if you go to a lower ranked regional, state, or community school with a good reputation that will get the job done. You can also stand out by building a network outside your school through joining professional organizations or finding mentors in your community.
3. If you take the Online route, make sure it still has the proper Accreditation. For example, for your engineering degree to be worth anything your Bachelors degree must be from an ABET accredited institution. If not, your degree is pretty much useless. The same goes for other professional careers such as in medicine or law. So just beware and make sure the program meets the minimum requirements of your chosen career.

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Laura’s Answer

I agree with some of the earlier folks that responded. Earlier on in your career, when you may not have as much experience, the university you attended and the reputation it has can do a lot for your career. That being said, I think that if you attend a college that may not be as well known, having great experience (internships, part time jobs, etc.) with reputable companies could be another great alternative. Personally, I attended a big university, Texas A&M. Aside from the reputation the university has, I would also urge you to consider the opportunities that are available to you from an alumni network.


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Simeon’s Answer

Most employers don't care what college you graduated from. As long as you have the completed degree from an established university, you shouldn't see much different in treatment than from those graduating from more traditional institutions. Focus on landing an internship if you get the opportunity.

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Melanie’s Answer

I think it all depends on the industry! For example, I'm in the Sports & Entertainment industry, involved specifically with the guest experience and engagement, and my interview was more heavily focused on my past experiences and what extracurricular activities I did in college. Also, they asked what major projects I had completed in college and how they would help me improve on what they currently have going on. I was really never asked about where I went to school but more asked about what I learned doing my time in college that would help not only me, but the organization in the long run.

Hope this helps!

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Rick’s Answer

https://harver.com/blog/hiring-biases/

https://www.fastcompany.com/3060544/despite-evidence-hiring-managers-are-biased-towards-graduates-from-top-colleges

It's not right if it does happen. Present yourself well. Have supporting information. Build your portfolio to be strong. Continue education.

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Ari’s Answer

Yes companies care about what school you attended because some schools are more prestigious or well known than others. Also some companies recruit from certain schools so I agree that you should ask the school that you are looking at for college about their job placements and what the career center at the school can do to assist you in finding a job before you graduate from college.

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Phaedra’s Answer

Many large companies have preferred schools that they recruit from, for lots of reasons. I think you want to ask your potential colleges about their job placement programs for graduates and how many graduates find jobs. Use the resources of the school to help you get a job. It's a hard process and the more help you can get, the better.


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Melanie’s Answer

I think it all depends on the industry! For example, I'm in the Sports & Entertainment industry, involved specifically with the guest experience and engagement, and my interview was more heavily focused on my past experiences and what extracurricular activities I did in college. Also, they asked what major projects I had completed in college and how they would help me improve on what they currently have going on. I was really never asked about where I went to school but more asked about what I learned doing my time in college that would help not only me, but the organization in the long run.

Hope this helps!

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Katya’s Answer

Hi DejaCodman2, it’s yes and no answer. It all depends which field yo are studying and company that you know for sure you want to work.

Some companies only hire from certain schools- but if you already did your research and know which company you want to dedicate your career to-then go ahead and do some research and read. If not, then I believe in my career over 17 years-it all depends on your experience.

Companies and recruiters in the past had different criteria’s they based their decision on- in today’s world -this has changed and a lot has to do your ability to adapt to change, your ability to be a team player, your ability to support the organization mission statement, and your ability to want to succeed.

So, if I were you- I would focus on how well you are doing. When I went for my first job interview- I did not have any professional experience but more like groceries, office work, shoe stores- they did care about my GPA, any recognition I got, any scholarship. This was a way for them to see if I would work hard and succeed.

Take what you have control over- be great in your current role- that means being a student!

Be able to get involved in your school and share your success stories. Be able to join your Community and also I out that onto your resume.these factors do make a difference-it’s ok that you don’t have professional experience, companies do understand-they doesn’t to see how well you did in college.

Best of luck

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