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Is it enough nowadays having a bachelors degree?

I’m considering getting a masters in the future because the way I see it the competition is getting way harder and a bachelors isn’t as impressive as it was before. So I’m thinking if it’s worth getting a masters. #bachelors #florida

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Tiffany’s Answer

Hi Luis,

The short answer is yes and no.


I got an MBA to change my career path (retail), and found when I got back into the workforce there was a lot of resistance due to my lack of experience in my field of choice (HR).


I found for many of my MBA cohort, those who were getting an MBA after having a degree and/or experience in Engineering, Finance, or Accounting, and this helped to augment the career paths they were already in.


So my advice is, if you are getting a master's degree that is easily translatable from your bachelor's...Go for it. Otherwise, it may be valuable to get experience in the field you are working towards. Also, don't feel the need to "break the bank" to go back to pursue a master's. Student loan debt can sort of cancel out the increase in pay you may anticipate after graduating. Food for thought. :) If you plan on continuing your education, consider private vs public universities, online programs, and experience or programs your current employer may provide.


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Jackie’s Answer

Hi Luis,

That's a really good question and a hard one to answer. To me, the answer is "it depends".

I think in some careers - ie software development, a Bachelor's degree is just fine. If you want to move into software architecture and design, you may need a Masters or, plan to work first for a few years as a software engineer before moving into an architect role.

In today's economic world, I think it is important to look at and understand the financial trade-off of an advanced degree like a Masters vs either 1) work experience; 2) professional development courses/certification programs. If you were to need student loans to complete your degree, would the financial gain you'd get from your job enable you to pay off your loans in a short period of time? If not, it may be more worthwhile to start your profession of choice, and then look for opportunities like having a mentor, professional development courses, or certifications. It may take you a bit longer to move into that advanced role - yet, in my opinion, it will also provide you a strong and diverse foundation. Nothing competes with hands-on experience in a field. Now, keep in mind I am also someone who is not a lawyer or medical professional where an advanced degree is required to even begin your career. :).

Depending on what field you are interested in - many can be very competitive. As someone who regularly reviews resumes and hires, I like to look for someone who has a strong understanding of the work at hand, real-life experience, as well as the educational background to back them up. I don't necessarily look for degrees, or, frankly certifications for that matter. I want people with diverse backgrounds who know how to deliver and are willing to do the work needed to contribute to delivery.

Good luck!
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Taylor’s Answer

Hi Luis!

First of all, keep your head up, the job market just continues to get more and more competitive as time goes on.

If you have recently graduated and are looking to start your career.... I would say to keep working on the job search. As a recent graduate it may feel more comfortable to go back to school than to face rejection or start your career. If you are having trouble finding an entry level job, try looking for paid internships with companies as well. These opportunities can help you make connections in a company you are interested in and will give you experience under your belt to set you apart from the competition when you start applying for jobs again. Also if you do go the internship route, make a point to meet and make connections with as many people in that organization as possible. It is important to have people established in a company as an advocate for you when you apply to jobs and they can also make recommendations and refer you to other companies with available positions.
Additionally these days, many large corporations will pay for all or a portion of your masters program after you have worked with them for a certain amount of time. This would be a great advantage financially and would make a master's degree worth the wait.

If you have been in the workforce for a significant amount of time... Looking into a master's program can be a great way to set you apart for career advancement opportunities. It is critical to weigh your options when looking at masters programs to figure out the best one for your lifestyle. Many colleges now offer "working professional" programs that allow you to continue working full time without having sacrifice your career to get another degree. Additionally, reach out to the company you currently work for to see if they have any college supplement programs or scholarship opportunities that fit your needs.

Hope this helps and good luck!
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