Skip to main content
2 answers
2
Asked 396 views Translate

How should I go about setting up a payment plan with my school so I have minimum loan damage after graduation

just looking for advice on a decent plan and trying to minimize student loans #planning

Thank you comment icon With loans, make sure you're paying the interest your entire time you're in school. Amidst studies and work, it can be an extra thing to remember but it's WORTH IT. Take time to plan out when your interest payments hit (typically monthly or bi-monthly). This way, your loan amount will not be growing/compounding with interest after you graduate and start paying the principal. Nikki Madero
+25 Karma if successful
From: You
To: Friend
Subject: Career question for you

2

2 answers


0
Updated Translate

Adam’s Answer

I had to finance most of my undergraduate studies. One thing that I think is important is to learn more about the different types of loans. Primarily you want to know what is subsidized vs. unsubsidized, you can find out more about that here: https://studentaid.gov/understand-aid/types/loans/subsidized-unsubsidized

What I normally recommend is seeking scholarships and taking what you need in loans but try to stay with government-backed loans if at all possible. Then when you graduate seek a job immediately and see if they have a continuing education program for a higher level degree and if so use that to jump start continuing your education at a slower pace but funded by the company you work for. While continuing school you should be able to have payments and interest deferred on a subset of your student loans. During that time period focus on paying down the high loans that you are unable to differ interest on.

This works well if you are seeking a profession where you can start in an entry-level role with an associate's degree then use this process to help with funding your advancements.
0
0
Updated Translate

Scott’s Answer

The best way to minimize "loan damage" after graduation is not to take any out... Student loans are miserable and many folks have them hanging around for 20+ years after graduation. Take it from someone that knows... First, Apply for as many scholarships as you can. Apply for 10-20 a week or more, make that your part time job. Second, pick a school that you can afford to pay for. Third some schools have a monthly payment plan for tuition. You will need to check with the school you are applying at to verify. Finally look at working at an employer that helps pay for college.  a quick Google search shows Publix, Wells Fargo, Comcast, Starbucks, AT&T and Bank of America are in your area and they all have some form of tuition reimbursement.

Scott recommends the following next steps:

First, Apply for as many scholarships as you can
Pick a school that you can afford to pay for
Check the school to see if they have a payment plan
Finally look at working at an employer that helps pay for college
0