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What career opportunities are abundant with a communication degree?

What jobs can I apply to as soon as I'm done with a BA in Communication? #college-student #career

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L’s Answer

Hi Alejandra,


Coming from a BA in Communications myself, I can say that you have a board choice of careers available for you. That is the beauty of this major. Because you have learned a little bit of everything, you can pursue a career in marketing, communications, public relations, advertising, writer, editor, journalism, and so on.


As for what career choice, that is up to you and where your passion and preferences lies. In my opinion, I think it will serve you best if you first consider what you enjoy to do then narrow down your scope to what opportunities would best fulfil those enjoyments. That is how I found the career I am planning on pursuing.


Kind Regards,

Lora M Kim

L recommends the following next steps:

Figure out what you enjoy to do first. Although there is an abundant choice of opportunities for your major, it will work in your favor if you figure out what you would like to pursue as a career.
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Ken’s Answer

The opportunities with a communications degree are very broad, so it is very important to get to know yourself better to see how your personality traits match with people in that field and meet and talk to people working in that area to see what they do, how they got there, and what advice that they have for you.


Getting to know yourself and how your personality traits relate to people involved in various career opportunities is very important in your decision making process. During my many years in Human Resources and College Recruiting, I ran across too many students who had skipped this very important step and ended up in a job situation which for which they were not well suited. Selecting a career area is like buying a pair of shoes. First you have to be properly fitted for the correct size, and then you need to try on and walk in the various shoe options to determine which is fits the best and is most comfortable for you to wear. Following are some important steps which I developed during my career which have been helpful to many .

Ken recommends the following next steps:

The first step is to take an interest and aptitude test and have it interpreted by your school counselor to see if you share the personality traits necessary to enter the field. You might want to do this again upon entry into college, as the interpretation might differ slightly due to the course offering of the school. However, do not wait until entering college, as the information from the test will help to determine the courses that you take in high school. Too many students, due to poor planning, end up paying for courses in college which they could have taken for free in high school.
Next, when you have the results of the testing, talk to the person at your high school and college who tracks and works with graduates to arrange to talk to, visit, and possibly shadow people doing what you think that you might want to do, so that you can get know what they are doing and how they got there. Here are some tips: ## http://www.wikihow.com/Network ## ## https://www.themuse.com/advice/nonawkward-ways-to-start-and-end-networking-conversations ## ## https://www.themuse.com/advice/4-questions-to-ask-your-network-besides-can-you-get-me-a-job?ref=carousel-slide-1 ##
Locate and attend meetings of professional associations to which people who are doing what you think that you want to do belong, so that you can get their advice. These associations may offer or know of intern, coop, shadowing, and scholarship opportunities. These associations are the means whereby the professionals keep abreast of their career area following college and advance in their career. You can locate them by asking your school academic advisor, favorite teachers, and the reference librarian at your local library. Here are some tips: ## https://www.careeronestop.org/BusinessCenter/Toolkit/find-professional-associations.aspx?&frd=true ## ## https://www.themuse.com/advice/9-tips-for-navigating-your-first-networking-event ##
• It is very important to express your appreciation to those who help you along the way to be able to continue to receive helpful information and to create important networking contacts along the way. Here are some good tips: ## https://www.themuse.com/advice/the-informational-interview-thank-you-note-smart-people-know-to-send?ref=recently-published-2 ## ## https://www.themuse.com/advice/3-tips-for-writing-a-thank-you-note-thatll-make-you-look-like-the-best-candidate-alive?bsft_eid=7e230cba-a92f-4ec7-8ca3-2f50c8fc9c3c&bsft_pid=d08b95c2-bc8f-4eae-8618-d0826841a284&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=daily_20171020&utm_source=blueshift&utm_content=daily_20171020&bsft_clkid=edfe52ae-9e40-4d90-8e6a-e0bb76116570&bsft_uid=54658fa1-0090-41fd-b88c-20a86c513a6c&bsft_mid=214115cb-cca2-4aec-aa86-92a31d371185&bsft_pp=2 ##
Here are some tips on reducing college costs. Too many people spend way too much money on an education and end up with unnecessarily high debt: ## http://www.educationplanner.org/students/paying-for-school/ways-to-pay/reduce-college-costs.shtml ##
Thank you comment icon • It really does not matter what school you attend, as the most important factors are how well you do with the school work, which is an indication to an employer about what kind of employee you will be, and the effort that you put forth in your networking to set up networking connections that will help you throughout your education/career journey. Here is an important video for you to watch: ## http://www.ted.com/talks/julie_lythcott_haims_how_to_raise_successful_kids_without_over_parenting?utm_campaign=social&utm_medium=referral&utm_source=facebook.com&utm_content=talk&utm_term=education ## Ken Simmons
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Cayla’s Answer

Hello Alejandra,

I've recently graduated with my BA in Communication this past summer with a concentration in public relations. Within your last year of college, I would suggest scoping out different internship opportunities with your college advisor, on Indeed.com or looking on your city job boards. Communication is a broad career field such as Lora stated, but doing your research on different careers and interning will help you narrow down what you'll be interested in doing once you start to look for an entry level job.

To say the least, you should narrow down your personal interest first and then search keywords from those things that interests you personally on Google and type communication career behind it.

Example: I love traveling. So some communication jobs that will allow me to travel will be an event manager, international journalist, or travel public relations specialist.

I've listed different categories from the communication field such as journalism, public relations, and marketing.

Networking. Network with people that find similar interests in that career path. It'll be worth getting your feet wet on the industry. Attend fashion events if you want to write for a fashion magazine one day, meet up with other creatives to discuss new changes within the industry, or offer freelancing skills.

Last but not least, don't stress yourself out figuring out what you want to do. It may take some time.

Cayla recommends the following next steps:

Find an internship or volunteer at a company that offers communication jobs to get a feel of the industry. It may not be something you're into.
Network, network, and network!!
Offer any skills you have to different companies.
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