10 answers
Asked Viewed 114 times Translate

Imagine that you are working on a project that is not going according to plan due to missing information and/or resources. What would you do in that scenario?


+25 Karma if successful
From: You
To: Friend
Subject: Career question for you
14
100% of 11 Pros
100% of 1 Students

10 answers


Updated Translate

ASLON’s Answer

If you are experiencing this, don't be alarmed. This is quite normal. There are always obstacles that pop up as you are moving your project along. The key is to quickly identify the issue and pull the right people together to brainstorm how to resolve the issue. Most of the time, assuming you have the right people in the meeting, the solution or path forward will be determined within the first couple of meetings. Sometimes it can take longer. The skilled project manager is able to quickly identify these roadblocks (because they always happen) and quickly find the solution to maintain the timelines. Hope this helps.

1
100% of 1 Pros
Updated Translate

Rebecca’s Answer

Hi there!

Program manager here so this problem comes up often for me! As others have said, asking for help is an easy place to start. Identifying where I'm missing information or resources is usually a result of putting together the project plan - how long with it take me to deliver the project, what are the steps involved, and who are the teams responsible.

Here's an example: you're a newly hired intern and your project involves publishing a video on the website titled "Get to know us." Your boss isn't exactly prepared for your first day, so that's all the information you have for your project. Where do you start? Since your boss is your only contact person at this point, you could start by asking for a list of people to talk to - who are good resources to learn more about the company or the goals of this project? Who could help me learn more about video production? Who could help me get a video posted on the website? From there, you could do interviews with those people to gather information necessary for your project plan: who are the stakeholders, who approves the video, how long will it take to produce, what is the due date, etc.

Any project can be approached this way. And, as you learn more about it & the goals you're trying to accomplish, you can go back to your "experts" to ask more questions.

1
100% of 1 Pros
Updated Translate

Marie’s Answer

Hi Oumou!

I agree with the advice to ask for help!
I would also suggest that whenever you are in a position where a project is not according to plan, it might be helpful to take some time to review the project and the end goal you are trying to achieve. Look again at the plan you have in place. Is there anything you know now that you didn't know at the start of the project? Is there anything you can do differently?

Give yourself time to look at the bigger picture. You may be surprised at what see.
Marie

0
Updated Translate

Bryce’s Answer

Hi Oumou,

If you are lacking information or resources from the person who assigned the project then I would definitely reach out to the person who assigned it and ask for more information. If it is a problem with finding information or resources I would also reach out to the person who assigned the project and see if they can point you in the right direction. I know it isn't always the easiest thing to do, but the best thing you can do in life when you are stuck or need help is to reach out to people that can help.

0
Updated Translate

Carolyn’s Answer

Hi Oumou,

In this case, I would first reach out to my professor and ask for some advice. I found that being proactive and asking for help when you first recognize there is a problem is usually the best way to go - both in college and now as a professional. Prepare the information that you do have and explain your issues in locating the balance of the information. Presenting what you have already put together shows that you've taken initiative.

Best of luck!

0
Updated Translate

Sunny’s Answer

Hi Oumou,

First, I would consider if that missing piece (info/ resource) is critical to the project. If so, then I have to do a further research to gather more information on that project. If it is not so important to the project topic, I would not worry too much and keep focusing on finishing the project.
I would also see if I have enough time to go back to the project and add more resources. Finishing the project on time is also very important, so if the due date for the project is right around the corner, I would just submit with what I have finished so far.

No matter if this is an individual/team project, I think it is helpful to have some different perspectives on the situation that you are in. So I want to suggest to reach out to your friends or teacher to share your situation and they would give you constructive feedback on this.

0
Updated Translate

Greta’s Answer

First off, take a step back, analyze the situation, and assess what is missing information wise, then determine the best avenue to obtain the missing information and resources. Focus on resources and information you do have initially, working those to completion, then work on the missing items or pieces of information.

0
Updated Translate

William’s Answer

In college, research projects can be very difficult if you don't know where to look for information. I would suggest for anyone seeking additional resources for some type of college project that your school's library often has research assistants that can help guide you to certain books, articles, etc. I think this help would usually be something you have access to virtually as well!

0
Updated Translate

Samantha’s Answer

Hello!

In this situation I would ask for help! If it is the professor lacking in information I would ask them to clarify. If it is another student who is lacking I would talk to them and the professor!

I would definitely reach out and use the resources around me, other classmates, professors, the internet.

Best of luck!

0
Updated Translate

Kim’s Answer

So, what if it was a school project and you had that problem? Don't overthink these sorts of questions! Basically, you would follow up with whoever was holding things up, make sure they understood the importance of your need, and if they didn't deliver, go to their supervisor. Not sure what resources, but, again, follow up if possible. Start discussing "What if" you don't get this in time, what are you going to do? Start developing a backup plan. Decide on a deadline, and, if you don't have what you need by then, go with plan B. Or, you could talk to your supervisor and ask for more time. It all depends on the project.

Obstacles are not put in your path to convince you to make a u-turn. You can go around them, over them, or through them. Never turn back!

Here's another one: Suppose you've been working on a big report, and you are just about to turn it in to your supervisor (deadline time!) and you discover it contains erroneous information. What do you do? There's no time to fix it. . .

These questions are designed to capture your thought processes. Are you going to give it to her as is and hope she doesn't catch it? I sure hope not!

Good question!

0