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Do you get residency in the state you go to college in after one year?

I want to go out of state for college, but it is really expensive. How long does it take to get residency and that will make my tuition costs in-state right. #college #expensive

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Jason’s Answer

I understand your pain from a parents point of view. Affordability is certainly a giant concern. That said higher learning institutions know all the angles and have done all they can to close the loop holes. Each institution will have their own rules, but in my experience most required at least a 12 month period prior to your application to establish residency. The other thing to consider is that your residency status will likely be locked in throughout your undergraduate tenure. I'm not a huge advocate for deferring education, but depending on your situation, it may be worthwhile if there is a perfect match for your interests and an institution that will offer much lower cost for in-State tuition. Remember, however you would have to move and unless you have a well paying job for a year, or free room and board while you wait, it wont be feasible.

Affordability is certainly very important, but just as important is to make sure the curriculum and resulting degree has earning potential. In my opinion there are far too many degreed program that cost a great deal of money, but offer very little in terms of earning potential. Do you homework to maximize your match in interests and earning potential, and just be within reason on cost. Also, do your best to position yourself with good grades, volunteerism, involvement, and relationships that will give you good recommendations so you will be more competitive when applying for scholarships.
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Hallie’s Answer

Hi Logan-- I think it's great that you are considering out-of-state colleges! Unfortunately, in my experience, universities typically make it pretty tough for students to be considered residents to qualify for in-state tuition. For example, my university required that a student must live in the state for 12 consecutive months, be enrolled less than full-time, be registered to vote in the state, have a state driver's license, be employed in the state for at least 30 hours/week, etc. The requirements will vary from place to place, though, so some universities may have less strict guidelines than that. I would recommend taking a look at the registrar websites of the schools. A lot of times, they will lay out the procedure for obtaining residency and qualifying for in-state tuition there. You might also check with the schools' financial aid offices. Many universities offer scholarships or aid specifically for out-of-state students.

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