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Level of diffuculty as a civil engineer?


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Trey’s Answer

Terrance:

The foundational aspects of most engineering degrees are fairly common across the various engineering disciplines for the first and most of the second years of college study. So, that part of an engineer's education is fairly the same. Once one ends the Sophomore year of engineering study, the engineering course switch to ones that are specific to the engineering field of study.

As Douglas mentioned in his response, if you are successful as an engineering student, then you will likely be motivated to learn the basic discipline in your declared field of study. However, the engineering education is no substitute for actual training on-the-job.

If you are interested in Civil Engineering, then I would recommend that you find an engineering college or university that has either a Summer internship or co-op opportunity for students. These types of programs will allow you to compete for either summer internships or, full semester co-op opportunities with companies in your field of study (e.g., Civil Engineering). Those opportunities will allow you to see if that is the field that you are interested in, or, that you would like to pursue.

In addition to building structures and roadways, Civil Engineers also design hydraulic channels, storm drain systems, water dams, water treatment and wastewater treatment systems. Many Civil Engineers also pursue advance engineering degrees in Environmental Engineering which further expands their opportunities.

Lastly, an Engineer never stops learning. As you start out as an engineer, you will generally work under the supervision of a degreed and registered "Professional Engineer" (P.E.) - most engineers are required to become registered P.E.'s after a period of time in order to practice engineering within a particular location.

Best wishes to you on your career journey!

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Trey’s Answer

Terrance:

The foundational aspects of most engineering degrees are fairly common across the various engineering disciplines for the first and most of the second years of college study. So, that part of an engineer's education is fairly the same. Once one ends the Sophomore year of engineering study, the engineering course switch to ones that are specific to the engineering field of study.

As Douglas mentioned in his response, if you are successful as an engineering student, then you will likely be motivated to learn the basic discipline in your declared field of study. However, the engineering education is no substitute for actual training on-the-job.

If you are interested in Civil Engineering, then I would recommend that you find an engineering college or university that has either a Summer internship or co-op opportunity for students. These types of programs will allow you to compete for either summer internships or, full semester co-op opportunities with companies in your field of study (e.g., Civil Engineering). Those opportunities will allow you to see if that is the field that you are interested in, or, that you would like to pursue.

In addition to building structures and roadways, Civil Engineers also design hydraulic channels, storm drain systems, water dams, water treatment and wastewater treatment systems. Many Civil Engineers also pursue advance engineering degrees in Environmental Engineering which further expands their opportunities.

Lastly, an Engineer never stops learning. As you start out as an engineer, you will generally work under the supervision of a degreed and registered "Professional Engineer" (P.E.) - most engineers are required to become registered P.E.'s after a period of time in order to practice engineering within a particular location.

Best wishes to you on your career journey!

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Douglas’s Answer

Hi,

If you are going to be very good in any engineering field it takes a lot of work. But, since presumidely you will be working at something that you like, the hard work will not feel burdensome. Some parts of civil engineering are more demanding than others. Civil engineers can design and build large, complex structures (e.g. buildings and bridges) while other civil engineers might be involved in designing and building roads which are difficult but not as demanding as building skyscrapers. So the difficulty of being a civil engineer somewhat depends on what you want to do and what you like to do. But, the basic education of all a civil engineers is basically the same because neither you or your instructors know what you might work on once you leave school so you will receive training in all facets of civil engineering.

Hope this helps,


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