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What is typical day like in your job

#medicine #medical-assistant #hospital-and-health-care

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Jocelyn’s Answer

I am registered nurse. I work three 12 hours shifts and have 4 days off. It’s a great schedule but very long days. My first day off I basically recovering from the week.
I work in a rural urgent care that functions as a stand alone ER. We’ve seen everything from him shot wounds, heart attacks, strokes, sepsis, lacerations, fractures, the complete unknown, and people from all around the world. It can be extremely busy, most days, as it’s one nurse and one provider. It’s rewarding to help patients figure out problems relating to lack of insurance and a treatment plan that is cost effective. It can also be very scary knowing a patient can crash on you at an minute. But, we like the adrenaline of it. I love being a nurse. Best career ever.
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Richard’s Answer

I am a radiologist. There are multiple subspecialties in Radiology, so each of my partners daily work is quite different. I am an Interventional radiologist. I spend about half my time looking at Medical Imaging ( CT, x-ray, ultrasound, and MRI) to diagnose diseases. The other half of my time is spent performing procedures. We use ultrasound, CT, and x-ray to guide various Tools into different parts of the body to diagnose and treat illness. We can open and close arteries and veins as necessary. We also inject radiation and chemotherapy directly into tumors.
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Anthony’s Answer

I am an optometrist. So, here is the best thing about my job if you fall into the line of "lover of science and business." I have switched my career multiple times through my career. I have owned my own practice, I have worked for a nursing home group for 10 years, and I am currently at Warby Parker. Each path is incredibly different on what aspects you use. Owning my own practice really made me into the business man I am today. The nursing home practice pushed me to become the physician that I am today. At this stage of my career, Warby Parker lets me apply each of these practices in a less strenuous approach. Warby is the best (optical) retail company out there and I will likely advance further a managerial role. I look at optometry as I look at nursing... so many opportunities for you, just depends on what flavor you want.
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Estelle’s Answer

Ob/Gyns practice office gynecology, deliver babies, and perform gynecologic surgery. I have been practicing gynecology for 30 yrs. I no longer deliver babies,and I focus on gynecology and gynecologic surgery. Office gynecology includes providing family planning services, diagnosis and treatment of sexually transmitted diseases, and treating pelvic pain. We perform well woman exams and cancer screening with pap smears and physical exams. I perform surgery one day per week and see patients in the office the other 4 days per week. My days usually start around 8 a.m and end around 5:30 p.m. Ob/Gyn is a very rewarding specialty in which we treat women of all ages.
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Kruti’s Answer

As a healthcare manager, I may be required to Rearrange and confirm work schedules, process and submit payroll, schedule meetings with various healthcare personnel, interview new applicants for hire from medical assisting to MDs, reorder supplies, review financial information for audits and billing
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Gil’s Answer

Hi, Ra-Asia,

I'm currently a medical assistant with Avance Care. I work in a primary care setting meaning we typically see patients that are dealing with high blood pressure, diabetes, and depression/anxiety. We see patients that need routine physical exams as well (especially those needed for sports like baseball and basketball).

I clock in at 7 am and get the following ready:

1. Patient exam rooms (tidy up the patient bed, make sure to have a thermometer, etc.).
2. Patient paperwork (handouts that we share with patients or any forms they have sent us ahead of their appointment to fill out).
3. Electronic medical records system (the program we use to house patient information on our laptops and desktops).

At 730 am I go to the waiting room and call in my first patient. I take their weight first and guide them to the patient exam room. I then go through the following steps:

1. Take notes on the reason for their visits and record on my laptop.
2. Ask about medications they are taking and any changes that have happened since their last visits (any surgeries? any new allergies?).
3. Measure their heart rate and oxygen saturation.
4. Take their temperature.
5. Check their blood pressure.

Next, I walk outside and let the provider (doctor, physician assistant, or nurse practitioner) know a recap of why the patient is there and then they go in to see the patient.

I help the provider with anything the patient may need such as x-rays, vaccine administration (shots), drawing blood, etc. after the provider comes out of the patient exam room. I share all updates with the provider to make sure they know what all has been performed and so they can review any tests we perform while the patient is still there. I guide the patient to the front desk for checkout after the provider has confirmed that the patient is good to go.

I go back to my desk and update the patients chart to include more notes and any test results before I go out and call my next patient. This happens at least 15 times during my 12 hour shift and I am able to get a lunch break from 12:45 pm to 1:30 pm.

Around 7 pm I make sure to do the following:

1. Clean the patient exam rooms so they are ready for the next day.
2. Share any remaining documents with the front desk so they can add to the patients chart.
3. Clean my workspace because I may not be there the next day and want my coworkers to have a clean workspace.
4. Sign off the electronic medical records system.

Lastly, I turn off the lights in the medical assistant station and leave the clinic knowing that I helped my patients with their healthcare needs!
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