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As a speech pathologist what type of work do you even do? What does a day in that work force look like?

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I never thought of this as a career but it was highly recommended on a test that I took so I would like to get more information. #speech-pathology

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2 answers

Afifa’s Answer

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I am not a speech pathologist, but I worked with some former speech pathologist at my previous company. Some speech pathologist may go into tech now with things like the Google Assistant or Amazon Alexa. They are coming up with automatic ways to make a computer voice sound natural. Linguistics is a big thing in the industry now in understanding human speech this includes dialects and accents. Also to make the tech accessible and useable by everyone. The device should understand someone that has a speech impairment

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Linda’s Answer

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Hi! You are asking a very perceptive question! I have been a speech pathologist for MANY years and I have had such a wonderful variety of positions. If you work in a school system you would be evaluating children for speech/language delays/disorders and working with other members of the evaluation team (classroom teacher, psychologist, special ed teacher, parents) to determine the type and amount the student should receive. You would have a caseload of students that you mat probably see in groups for 1/2 hour sessions. There is more of an emphasis now on SLPs working within the classroom setting with students on one’s caseload, so ‘blending in’ with whatever the classroom teacher has planned is super important, I will tell you that there WILL be paperwork, lesson planning, and meetings in addition to working with students during the day. It is NOT a 8-4 job. I will tell you that once you get used to the school system you can get into your own routine to manage the paperwork, meetings and lesson plans. It IS a wonderful profession and you will know at the end of the day you have made a difference.

Linda recommends the following next steps:

  • See if you can ‘shadow’ an SLP who works in a school, hospital, and/or clinic to get an idea of what is involved. Each setting has its own specific requirements.
  • Visit the American Speech Language Hearing Association website www.asha.org for more information and resources.
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