Skip to main content
6 answers
6
Asked 331 views

How long did it take for you to get to the point you are today?

17 and don't want a 9-5 #scientist #geoscientist #college

+25 Karma if successful
From: You
To: Friend
Subject: Career question for you

6

6 answers


1
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Paola’s Answer

Not as long as I thought it was going to take! What I mean by that is that when I decided to become a doctor and a medical researcher, people told me that it would take too long and that it would be too hard. Thankfully I didn't listen to those people and went for it. After med school, plus 4 years for my Ph.D. and 5 more years doing postdoctoral fellowships, I can tell you that I enjoyed every minute of it. When you are truly in love with what you do, time flies! In addition, knowing that I would be contributing with new treatments for incurable diseases has always been such a motivator that time is irrelevant. Find something that you are passionate about and I guarantee you that you will not have to worry about time. And for those reading this who cannot afford a long career, I would say that in these times of non-traditional and online education there are numerous options to go to school, you can go to school part-time, and you can resume schooling after you have to take a break for either economical or family reasons. Put together a plan and go for it!
1
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Emily’s Answer

It took me 7 years after college to complete my master's in counseling psychology, become licensed and get my first job as a high school counselor. I could have done it faster if I didn't mind taking on more loans for graduate school, but instead I went to graduate school part-time while working full-time at the university where I got my master's degree. In this way, I was able to complete my graduate program mostly for free because 2-3 courses per year were included as a benefit in my job. Most universities operate this way and it's a great way to earn a master's without taking on additional debt. If you do the graduate program full-time, it takes 2 years + a 1 year internship. I usually took one or two courses at a time while working full-time and did this over a 4-5 year span to complete the 48 credits required in the state of MA. In order to also complete the required one-year internship before getting licensed, I quit my job after the 5th year and did a one-year unpaid internship while living at home. Others in my program did work part-time while completing their internship. I was hired the year after my internship and have been a counselor ever since. I've now been a counselor for 12 years. I believe it took me about 5 years to feel like a had a good handle on things.
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Kim’s Answer

Kameron,

Typically, a job as a scientist will take years of schooling. There are alternatives. One is to find science-related jobs in the military. They will train you! Such as water treatment. https://www.goarmy.com/careers-and-jobs/browse-career-and-job-categories/construction-engineering/water-treatment-specialist.html

Another would be to go into law enforcement, and work up towards detective/investigator.But, that could take quite a while, and the training would come in increments. A special course here, a special course there.

You do not have to work 9-5. There are jobs out there, such as law enforcement. Or, working for the oil refineries, where you work crazy hours for a few weeks and then get a few weeks off. I loved shift work. I loved being off during the week, going shopping, or camping, when there were fewer people out there!

Keep looking, and, you will find what you want.
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Samira’s Answer

Careers are a marathon rather than a sprint. As important as it is to check up on your timeline, reassess or reevaluate goals, and make the necessary small or drastic changes as you deem fit, micromanaging your timeline will deprive you from the joy that accompanies the journey. I have been in the industry for 4 years and approaching a mid senior level. Some colleagues have taken lesser and advanced to other roles, while some have more than a dozen years of experience but occupy associate roles. My advice is, the journey in your career might take you places you never imagined. You might fall in love with your current role while waiting on your dream job, or you might land your dream job straight out of college. Whichever route, enjoy the moment, every minute of it. Your losses will become your biggest motivation. The beauty of the process is, in the event you start over, you are starting from experience rather than from scratch. All the very best in the future!
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

alan’s Answer

My career was built on multiple platforms. I achieved my first platform as a teacher right out of college. Building on that I became a counselor. That platform led me to a career as a psychologist. After twenty years in private practice I went back to teaching. Right now I am retired but planning to write a book. All this took 60 years and I’m not finished yet.
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Suzanne’s Answer

Hi Kameron,

For someone now in their mid-thirties, I can honestly say that what I thought I would be doing as a career and what I am actually doing today couldn't be any farther apart on the spectrum, however, through my work experience, I found that I am interested and capable of doing so much more than I ever thought.

If you decide to further your education and go to college, pick a major that interests you, and study it, but don't limit yourself post-graduation to that field. I studied political science in college and truly thought I would attend law school and become an elected official...that did not happen. After graduation, I decided to accept an entry-level position in a Fortune 500 company. By the way, the position was in sales and was not a 9-5 position. Unexpectedly, I became very successful in the sales field, something I never thought I would be doing as a career. That success opened the door to other opportunities and again, after 10 years with the same company, I now find myself in an operational position on a corporate strategy team. My point is, experience comes in different forms outside of 9-5 positions, but be open to the possibilities. Your talents will shine through in different work experiences. It took me 10 years to get to the point in my career where I truly feel confident in what I am doing, even though I am completely out of my comfort zone, 90% of the time. In my opinion, the moment you feel comfortable in what you're doing is when it is time to strive for something more.

Don't be closed off to a 9-5, it's career fulfillment you should be after...it's not the hours you work, it's the work you put in during those hours.
0